OECD Journal: Competition Law and Policy

Discontinued
Frequency
3 times a year
ISSN: 
1609-7521 (online)
ISSN: 
1560-7771 (print)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/16097521
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This journal draws on the best of the recent work done for and by the OECD Committee on Competition Law and Policy. Its articles provide insight into the thinking a competition law enforcers, and focus on the practical application of competition law and policy. Here’s what Robert Pitofsky, Chairman of the US Federal Trade Commission said about this new journal when it was launched: "Global competition is the wave of the future, and comparative analysis of the laws and practices of various members of the worldwide community of nations is a necessary corollary. This new OECD Journal of Competition Law and Policy, compiled from OECD Round Table discussions, summaries of recent developments, and articles on topics of special interest, will introduce regulators, practitioners, and scholars to different regulatory approaches around the world and will allow us to consider in a more informed way the strengths and weaknesses of our own systems."

Now published as part of the OECD Journal package.

Also available in French
Article
 

Review of Competition Law and Policy in Canada You do not have access to this content

English
 
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/2403211ec003.pdf
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Author(s):
Michael Wise
26 May 2003
Pages:
63
Bibliographic information
No.:
3,
Volume:
5,
Issue:
1
Pages:
47–107
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/clp-v5-art3-en

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Important issues in competition policy in Canada today are the independence and powers of the institutions and the balance between competition policy principles and national interests. The foundations of policy are being tested in merger litigation over the meaning of efficiency. Enforcement against cartels is complicated by a need to show that restraints are "undue." Canada's "conformity continuum" offers an important, distinctive contribution to enforcement practice. Responses to controversies sometimes appear ad hoc, but the outcomes, such as the laws about banking mergers and about airlines, have recognised competition concerns. Policy options for consideration include finding other means to promote the goals now served by ownership controls, reviewing the scope of federal and provincial regulatory constraints on competition, clarifying the scope of the Commissioner's decision-making independence, and making enforcement more efficient by providing for private action, improving the decision process, and clarifying the anti-cartel principle.

Also available in French
 
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