OECD Journal on Budgeting

Frequency
3 times a year
ISSN: 
1681-2336 (online)
ISSN: 
1608-7143 (print)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/16812336
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The OECD journal on public sector budgeting, published three times per year. It draws on the best of the recent work of the OECD Working Party of Senior Budget Officials (SBO), as well as special contributions from finance ministries, and makes it available to a wider community in an accessible format. The journal provides insight on leading-edge institutional arrangements, systems and instruments for the allocation and management of resources in the public sector. Now published as a part of the OECD Journal subscription package.

Also available in French
 

Volume 6, Issue 1 You do not have access to this content

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  13 Oct 2006
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/4206011ec002.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/governance/budgeting-in-norway_budget-v6-art2-en
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Budgeting in Norway
Barry Anderson, Teresa Curristine, Olaf Merk
Norway is a prosperous country with a healthy economy and a very high standard of living. Norway provides a truly unique example of long-term budgetary planning through its successful management of oil assets by means of the Government Pension Fund – Global. This article examines the annual budget process which is an important factor in the health of Norway’s public finances. The cabinet has a central role in formulating the budget via the annual budget conferences. Parliament has a strong formal position, and the Ministry of Finance has a long tradition of providing objective and unbiased information to Parliament. The article also describes the high degree of managerial flexibility, the system of accountability for results, human resource management, financial management and reporting, the use of performance information, and the role of local and regional governments.
  13 Oct 2006
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/4206011ec003.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/governance/budgeting-in-singapore_budget-v6-art3-en
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Budgeting in Singapore
Jón R. Blöndal
The public finance system of Singapore consists of four "pillars": the budget sector itself; the Central Provident Fund; the government investment agencies; and various special funds not consolidated into the budget. The budget process is characterised by close interministerial co-operation and the use of constitutional fiscal rules, spending ceilings for ministries ("block budgets"), across-the-board budget extractions (spending cuts), endowment funds, central manpower controls, and continual underspending. Parliament has a limited role. The President of the Republic has an important role as "fiscal guardian". The article describes these particular features of the Singapore budget process, and discusses other elements of budget implementation and government management such as the organisational structure of the government, the execution of budget appropriations, personnel management, financial management and reporting, and performance and results initiatives.
  13 Oct 2006
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/4206011ec004.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/governance/top-down-budgeting-as-a-tool-for-central-resource-management_budget-v6-art4-en
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Top-down Budgeting as a Tool for Central Resource Management
John M. Kim, Chung-Keun Park
Top-down budgeting emerged in the 1990s as a response to fiscal crisis. Previously, the traditional bottom-up approach to budget formulation had conferred centralised authority for resource allocation on the finance ministry. Then, in an attempt to control the growing fiscal deficits in the 1990s, the finance ministry only set the overall expenditure ceiling and subceilings, and delegated detailed resource allocation decisions to line ministries. However, the level of delegation and the method of determining the expenditure ceilings vary across countries. This article describes country experiences with top-down budgeting and makes policy suggestions for its use as a tool for central resource management. The article also explores the relative advantages, disadvantages, and complementarities of the two approaches.
  13 Oct 2006
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/4206011ec005.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/governance/assessing-fiscal-risks-through-long-term-budget-projections_budget-v6-art5-en
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Assessing Fiscal Risks through Long-term Budget Projections
Pål Ulla
Long-term budget projections are in their infancy. The method described here is a bottom-up approach to measure future fiscal challenges. The sustainability criteria must be regarded as restrictions of the total fiscal aggregates, confronting bottom-up projections with top-down limits. Uncertainties have often given long-term projections little credibility;  sensitivity analysis has to be done. This article discusses the main reasons for uncertainty and how to handle them. In most OECD countries the increase in the elderly population is not only a transitory problem created by high fertility rates after the Second World War. Higher longevity will create permanent higher old-age dependency rates in the future. Some projections even indicate that those rates will increase after the baby-boom generation is gone. Thus it is necessary to consider both how pension reforms are formulated and a broader agenda for reform of the public sector. Given the lower supply of labour, it may be important to modernise the public sector and create less public demand for labour. In many countries, policy reforms will be necessary to create fiscal sustainability to avoid future fiscal risks.
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