OECD Journal: Competition Law and Policy

Discontinued
Frequency :
3 times a year
ISSN :
1609-7521 (online)
ISSN :
1560-7771 (print)
DOI :
10.1787/16097521
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This journal draws on the best of the recent work done for and by the OECD Committee on Competition Law and Policy. Its articles provide insight into the thinking a competition law enforcers, and focus on the practical application of competition law and policy. Here’s what Robert Pitofsky, Chairman of the US Federal Trade Commission said about this new journal when it was launched: "Global competition is the wave of the future, and comparative analysis of the laws and practices of various members of the worldwide community of nations is a necessary corollary. This new OECD Journal of Competition Law and Policy, compiled from OECD Round Table discussions, summaries of recent developments, and articles on topics of special interest, will introduce regulators, practitioners, and scholars to different regulatory approaches around the world and will allow us to consider in a more informed way the strengths and weaknesses of our own systems."

Now published as part of the OECD Journal package.

Also available in: French
 
 
 

Volume 4, Issue 1 You do not have access to this content

Publication Date :
22 May 2002
DOI :
10.1787/clp-v4-1-en
Also available in: French

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  22 May 2002 Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/2402211ec001.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/governance/review-of-competition-law-and-policy-in-the-czech-republic_clp-v4-art1-en
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Review of Competition Law and Policy in the Czech Republic
Michael Wise

The Czech Republic competition law is based on familiar European substantive concepts. Features that were appropriate for a transition setting are being revised in anticipation of EU accession. The enforcement body was at one time a separate Ministry; now, the Czech Office for the Protection of Economic Competition is an independent agency. Provisions for exemption are well controlled, and the processes for applying it are working well; however, stronger enforcement powers may be needed to deal with secret cartels. The major challenge of improving competitiveness by completing the reform of the inherited industrial structure requires solving problems of corporate governance and financing. The role of competition policy in that task will be modest.

  22 May 2002 Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/2402211ec002.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/governance/portfolio-effects-in-conglomerate-mergers_clp-v4-art2-en
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Portfolio Effects in Conglomerate Mergers
OECD

In the context of conglomerate merger review, portfolio effects seem to refer to the pro- and anti-competitive effects possibly arising when: the parties enjoy market power but not necessarily dominance; and the products joined are complementary or have analogous properties. When complementary products are merged, there is a potential for considerable synergies that could benefit buyers. There is also an increased potential for forced tying, pure bundling, or analogous practices (e.g. full line forcing) that could restrict buyer choice but also lower prices. Under certain strict conditions, consumers could gain in the short run but suffer long term harm from such practices if they eventually result in a sufficient reduction of competitors and capacity in a market. The hypothetical nature of such harm has led some to conclude that instead of prohibiting mergers having potentially harmful portfolio effects, competition agencies should instead take a wait and see attitude. That would involve using abuse of dominance or monopolisation prohibitions to control negative effects should they actually materialise.

  22 May 2002 Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/2402211ec003.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/governance/reform-of-the-railway-sector-in-russia_clp-v4-art3-en
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Reform of the Railway Sector in Russia
Darryl Biggar

The rail industry in Russia is one of the largest in the world. Russia’s vast distances, relatively under-developed road infrastructure, and high reliance on bulk commodities imply that the rail industry has a unique and key role in the transportation infrastructure of Russia. At present the industry is organised as a fully-integrated entity, operated by the Ministry of Railways. At a seminar in Moscow in December 2000, OECD experts and Russian officials discussed how this industry could be restructured to promote competition, enhance efficiency and to ensure that this industry best meets the needs of the growing Russian economy. The following summary sets out the key ideas and conclusions to emerge from that seminar. Three main topics are discussed: policies to establish a sound commercial environment for railway operators, structural options for competition and managing the transition to a competitive structure. A key issue is whether it would be possible to enhance competition by dividing the Russian rail industry into a number of verticaly-integrated railways, competing for the provision of rail services along the key rail transport corridors.

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