OECD Journal: Competition Law and Policy

Discontinued
Frequency
3 times a year
ISSN: 
1609-7521 (online)
ISSN: 
1560-7771 (print)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/16097521
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This journal draws on the best of the recent work done for and by the OECD Committee on Competition Law and Policy. Its articles provide insight into the thinking a competition law enforcers, and focus on the practical application of competition law and policy. Here’s what Robert Pitofsky, Chairman of the US Federal Trade Commission said about this new journal when it was launched: "Global competition is the wave of the future, and comparative analysis of the laws and practices of various members of the worldwide community of nations is a necessary corollary. This new OECD Journal of Competition Law and Policy, compiled from OECD Round Table discussions, summaries of recent developments, and articles on topics of special interest, will introduce regulators, practitioners, and scholars to different regulatory approaches around the world and will allow us to consider in a more informed way the strengths and weaknesses of our own systems."

Now published as part of the OECD Journal package.

Also available in French
Article
 

Capacity Building for Effective Competition Policy in Developing and Transitioning Economies You do not have access to this content

English
 
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/2402241ec002.pdf
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Author(s):
OECD
07 Apr 2003
Pages:
19
Bibliographic information
No.:
13,
Volume:
4,
Issue:
4
Pages:
7–23
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/clp-v4-art13-en

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This note begins by briefly addressing why competition policy is important for developing and transitioning economies. It then discusses some of the critical components of building a competition culture. Ideally, this process should begin by conducting a "needs assessment" in a number of areas. This assessment likely will lead to the identification of a list of steps that should be prioritised and undertaken. The priorities often can be grouped into three broad areas, namely, helping key constituencies to "buy in" to a competition culture, minimizing the extent to which a broad range of institutional mechanisms distort competition, and building an effective competition law enforcement regime to address private anticompetitive conduct. The note then summarizes the valuable perspectives of countries that have been providers or recipients of capacity building and technical assistance. It is based upon the responses to a questionnaire circulated in 2001 to delegates of the OECD’s Competition Committee and non-members who had been invited to participate in the second Global Forum on Competition, held in February 2002. This discussion is followed by a brief discussion of the potentially helpful roles that cooperation and peer review can play in the process of building the institutional capacity of a domestic enforcement authority. After briefly discussing the Doha Declaration, the note summarises the OECD’s capacity building activities in the competition field. Finally, in the conclusion, some suggestions are offered regarding a multi-faceted strategy for future capacity building and technical assistance activities.

Also available in French
 
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