OECD Regional Development Working Papers

ISSN :
2073-7009 (en ligne)
DOI :
10.1787/20737009
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Working papers from the Regional Development Policy Division of the OECD cover a full range of topics including regional statistics and analysis, urban governance and economics, rural governance and economics, and multi-level governance. Depending on the programme of work, the papers can cover specific topics such as regional innovation and networks, the determinants of regional growth or fiscal consolidation at the sub-national level.
 

Financing Green Urban Infrastructure You or your institution have access to this content

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Auteur(s):
Olaf Merk1, Stéphane Saussier2, Carine Staropoli3, Enid Slack4, Jay-Hyung Kim5
Author Affiliations
  • 1: OCDE, France

  • 2: Sorbonne Business School, France

  • 3: Université Paris I, France

  • 4: University de Toronto, Canada

  • 5: Korea Development Institute, Corée, République de

Date de publication
24 sep 2012
Bibliographic information
No:
2012/10
Pages
65
DOI
10.1787/5k92p0c6j6r0-en

Cacher / Voir l'abstract

This paper presents an overview of practices and challenges related to financing green sustainable cities. Cities are essential actors in stimulating green infrastructure; and urban finance is one of the promising ways in which this can be achieved. Cities are key investors in infrastructure with green potential, such as buildings, transport, water and waste. Their main revenue sources, such as property taxes, transport fees and other charges, are based on these same sectors; cities thus have great potential to ?green? their financial instruments. At the same time, increased public constraints call for a mobilisation of new sources of finance and partnerships with the private sector. This working paper analyses several of these sources: public-private partnerships, tax-increment financing, development charges, value-capture taxes, loans, bonds and carbon finance. The challenge in mobilising these instruments is to design them in a green way, while building capacity to engage in real co-operative and flexible arrangements with the private sector.
Mots-clés:
private finance, urban finance, infrastructure finance, urban infrastructure, urban development, green growth, public private partnerships