International Migration Outlook 2008
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International Migration Outlook 2008

This edition focuses on the employment situation of immigrants. For the first time, this report presents a "scoreboard" of labour-market integration of immigrants, as well as an analysis of wage differentials between immigrants and the native-born.

The publication also examines the new laws governing immigrants’ entry, stay and access to the labour market. The selective recruitment of immigrants according to labour market needs is described, as are measures to facilitate the integration of immigrants. International cooperation to improve border control and to combat irregular migration is analysed in detail.

Two special chapters analyse topical issues. The first addresses the management of migration of lower-skilled workers and reviews the different types of existing temporary and permanent programmes. Special attention is devoted to the issue of illegal employment of  foreigners and to regularisation programmes.  The second chapter presents an in-depth study of return migration and looks at its impact on the economic development of sending countries.

A dynamic link (StatLink) is provided for each table and graph. It directs the user to a web page where the corresponding data are available in Excel® format.



 

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Date de publication :
10 sep 2008
DOI :
10.1787/migr_outlook-2008-en
 
Chapitre
 

Management of Low-Skilled Labour Migration You do not have access to this content

Anglais
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Auteur(s):
OCDE
Pages :
125–159
DOI :
10.1787/migr_outlook-2008-6-en

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Government policy with respect to managed migration has concentrated on attracting high-skilled workers, as OECD countries vie to attract the most highly educated professionals in key industries. Labour market shortages, however, are also appearing in many lesser skilled jobs. Rising educational levels and shrinking numbers of young people mean in practice that there are fewer native-born people available and willing to perform these low-wage jobs in many OECD countries. In many countries, the demand for workers for low-skilled jobs has been met partly through migration. Indeed, immigrants have already been playing a significant role in meeting the demand for workers for such jobs.
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