OECD Digital Economy Papers

ISSN :
2071-6826 (en ligne)
DOI :
10.1787/20716826
Cacher / Voir l'abstract
The OECD Directorate for Science, Technology and Industry (STI) undertakes a wide range of activities to better understand how information and communication technologies (ICTs) contribute to sustainable economic growth and social well-being. The OECD Digital Economy Papers series covers a broad range of ICT-related issues and makes selected studies available to a wider readership. They include policy reports, which are officially declassified by an OECD Committee, and occasional working papers, which are meant to share early knowledge.
 

The Relationship between Local Content, Internet Development and Access Prices You or your institution have access to this content

Cliquez pour accéder: 
Auteur(s):
OECD/ISOC/UNESCO
Date de publication
18 fév 2013
Bibliographic information
N°:
217
Pages
141
DOI
10.1787/5k4c1rq2bqvk-en

Cacher / Voir l'abstract

This research study is the result of a collaboration between the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the Internet Society (ISOC) and UNESCO. The study was initially presented at the sixth annual meeting of the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) on 27 September 2011 in Nairobi (Kenya).

The study confirms that local content, Internet infrastructure and access prices are three inter-related elements. In particular: (i) better connectivity is significantly related to higher levels of local digital content creation; (ii) countries with more Internet infrastructure (at all income levels) are also countries which produce more local digital content as measured by Wikipedia entries and by web pages under a given country-code, top-level domain; (iii) countries with more international connectivity have lower domestic broadband prices, and countries with better domestic infrastructure have lower international bandwidth prices.

The study concludes that three key lines of policy considerations evolve out of this research: (i) fostering content development, (ii) expanding connectivity, and (iii) promoting Internet access competition.