OECD Environment Working Papers

ISSN :
1997-0900 (en ligne)
DOI :
10.1787/19970900
Cacher / Voir l'abstract
This series is designed to make available to a wider readership selected studies on environmental issues prepared for use within the OECD. Authorship is usually collective, but principal authors are named. The papers are generally available only in their original language English or French with a summary in the other if available.
 

Lessons from 15 Years of Experience with the Dutch Tax Allowance for Energy Investments for Firms You or your institution have access to this content

Anglais
Cliquez pour accéder: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/5k47zw350q8v.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/environment/lessons-from-15-years-of-experience-with-the-dutch-tax-allowance-for-energy-investments-for-firms_5k47zw350q8v-en
  • LIRE
Auteur(s):
Arjan Ruijs1, Herman R.J. Vollebergh1
Author Affiliations
  • 1: PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, Pays-Bas

Date de publication
19 avr 2013
Bibliographic information
N°:
55
Pages
31
DOI
10.1787/5k47zw350q8v-en

Cacher / Voir l'abstract

Since 1997, the Netherlands has had a tax allowance scheme that was introduced to promote investments in energy-saving technologies and sustainable energy production. This so-called Energy Investment Tax Allowance (EIA in Dutch) reduces up-front investment costs for firms investing in the newest energy-saving and sustainable energy technologies. The basic design of the EIA has remained the same over the past 15 years. Firms investing in technologies listed in the annually updated ‘Energy List’ may deduct some of the investment costs from their taxable profits in the year of the investment. Compared to investments in conventional reference technologies, the EIA decreases the payback period and reduces the need of financing the investments in energy-saving technologies. The EIA may also reduce search costs made by investors to find particular technologies, because entry on the Energy List equals eligibility for the subsidy. The Energy List contains generic technologies that meet a certain energy-saving standard or a selection of novel, but proven, technologies with a higher energy-saving potential than conventional technologies. Therefore, the list itself is also likely to have an attention value that may contribute to reduce information failures in the market for technology adoption. Over the past 15 years, the EIA has been affected by a number of changes, mainly due to exogenous factors, such as interactions with other policy instruments, rising oil and gas prices, and the economic crisis since 2007. Despite this turbulence and changes in government focus, the EIA remains part of the Dutch energy policy mix. Its flexibility allowed for adaptations where necessary and its role as a subsidy for technology adoption is likely to also have contributed to its legitimacy.
Mots-clés:
tax, tax preference, policy evaluation, environment, investment
Classification JEL:
  • H23: Public Economics / Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue / Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
  • H25: Public Economics / Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue / Business Taxes and Subsidies
  • H32: Public Economics / Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents / Firm
  • O33: Economic Development, Technological Change, and Growth / Technological Change; Research and Development; Intellectual Property Rights / Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
  • Q48: Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics / Energy / Government Policy