Energy Policies of IEA Countries

Agence Internationale de l'Energie

ISSN :
1990-0082 (en ligne)
ISSN :
1021-3872 (imprimé)
DOI :
10.1787/19900082
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This series consists of two components. The first is an annual compilation by the International Energy Agency containing a broad analysis of recent trends and an easily accessible overview of energy policy during the last 12 months along with summaries of individual country reports done during the period. It also presents the major findings of the latest World Energy Outlook, key statistical information and brief summaries of major IEA publications released during the past year. The second component is the set of country reviews produced each year. IEA countries are on a five-year review cycle, which means that approximately five countries are reviewed in detail each year and published as part of the Energy Policies of IEA Countries series.

 
Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Slovak Republic 2012

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Agence Internationale de l'Energie

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Auteur(s):
AIE
Date de publication :
06 fév 2012
Pages :
150
ISBN :
9789264173507 (PDF) ; 9789264098244 (imprimé)
DOI :
10.1787/9789264173507-en

Cacher / Voir l'abstract

The Slovak Republic imports virtually all of its natural gas and crude oil from a single supplier, the Russian Federation. Energy security is therefore an overarching concern and priority in the Slovak Republicfs energy policy agenda. The government is taking steps to diversify supplies and build on lessons learned from the gas supply disruption in 2009. 

Enhancing regional co-operation, particularly in the development of gas and electricity interconnections, is an essential step towards meeting the dual policy objectives of enhancing energy security and market competition. The Slovak Republic has moved forward with coupling its electricity market with the Czech Republic's, and supports the construction of a North-South pipeline connection that would link planned LNG terminals in Croatia and Poland, including an interconnector to Hungary. 

Despite a sharp decline in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions since 1990, the Slovak Republic remains a GHG-intensive economy by OECD standards, with energy-related CO2 emissions accounting for over 70% of total GHG emissions. The country must continue to implement policies that ease the transition to a low-carbon economy. Nuclear power and renewable energy can play crucial roles in the Slovak Republicfs efforts to decarbonise its electricity production. Significant efforts can also be made to improve energy efficiency, especially in the transport and building sectors. District heating is a notable area with huge potential for reducing national GHG emissions. 

This review analyses the energy-policy challenges currently facing the Slovak Republic, and provides sectoral studies and recommendations for further policy improvements. It is intended to help guide the country towards a more secure and sustainable energy future.

Table des matières

1. Executive Summary and Key Recommendations
-Executive summary
-Key recommendations
PART I. POLICY ANALYSIS
2. General Energy Policy 
-Country overview
-Supply and demand
-Energy policy institutions
-Key energy policy directions
-Energy security
-Regional initiatives
-Market reforms
-Energy prices, taxes and subsidies
-Critique
-Recommendations
3. Energy and Climate Change
-CO2 emissions from fuel combustion
-Targets and objectives
-Emissions projections
-Policies and measures
-Air quality
-Critique
-Recommendations
4. Energy Efficiency
-Overview
-Institutional framework
-Policies and measures
-Critique
-Recommendations
PART II. SECTOR ANALYSIS
5. Renewable Energy 
-Supply and demand
-Renewable energy potential and current use
-Policies and measures
-Grid access and stability
-Critique
-Recommendations
6. Natural Gas
-Supply and demand
-Industry structure
-Market reform
-Infrastructure
-Gas security policy
-Prices and tariffs
-Critique
-Recommendations
7. Oil
-Supply, demand and imports
-Infrastructure
-Emergency response policy and emergency organisation
-Emergency oil reserves
-Prices and taxes
-Critique
-Recommendations
8. Coal
-Supply and demand
-Lignite mining
-Coal]fired power plants
-Coal policy and subsidies
-Critique
-Recommendations
9. Electricity
-Supply and demand
-Industry structure
-Policy directions and regulatory framework
-Network infrastructure and operations
-Prices and tariffs
-Critique
-Recommendations
10. Heat
-Supply and demand
-Market structure
-Policy framework
-Regulation
-Prices
-Critique
-Recommendations
11. Nuclear Energy
-Background
-Institutional arrangements
-Present status of nuclear power plants
-Critique
-Recommendations
PART III. ENERGY TECHNOLOGY
12. Energy Technology and R&D 
-Research and development policy
-Institutions
-National R&D budget
-Key research areas and selected projects
-International collaboration
-Critique
-Recommendations
PART IV. ANNEXES
ANNEX A: Organisation of the review
ANNEX B: Energy balances and key statistical data
ANNEX C: International Energy Agency gShared Goalsh
ANNEX D: Glossary and list of abbreviations