OECD Economics Department Working Papers

ISSN :
1815-1973 (en ligne)
DOI :
10.1787/18151973
Cacher / Voir l'abstract
Working papers from the Economics Department of the OECD that cover the full range of the Department’s work including the economic situation, policy analysis and projections; fiscal policy, public expenditure and taxation; and structural issues including ageing, growth and productivity, migration, environment, human capital, housing, trade and investment, labour markets, regulatory reform, competition, health, and other issues.

The views expressed in these papers are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of the OECD or of the governments of its member countries.

 

Reforming China's Monetary Policy Framework to Meet Domestic Objectives You or your institution have access to this content

Anglais
Cliquez pour accéder: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/5km32vmsq6f2.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economics/reforming-china-s-monetary-policy-framework-to-meet-domestic-objectives_5km32vmsq6f2-en
  • LIRE
Auteur(s):
Paul Conway, Richard Herd1, Thomas Chalaux1
Author Affiliations
  • 1: OCDE, France

Date de publication
16 déc 2010
Bibliographic information
N°:
822
Pages
51
DOI
10.1787/5km32vmsq6f2-en

Cacher / Voir l'abstract

As a result of reforms and financial sector development, the People’s Bank of China (PBoC) now exerts significant control over money market interest rates. With money market conditions increasingly influencing effective commercial lending rates, the PBoC is also able to affect the cost of credit without recourse to its benchmark commercial bank rates. Furthermore, interest rates are an important determinant of investment spending in China, via the user cost of capital, and aggregate economic activity influences inflation. Hence, greater use of interest rates in implementing monetary policy would enhance macroeconomic stabilisation while avoiding a number of drawbacks of the current quantity-based approach. In addition, increased flexibility in the exchange rate would enhance its role in offsetting macroeconomic shocks and allow the PBoC more scope to tailor monetary policy to domestic macroeconomic conditions. Concurrently, changes in the PBoC’s policy stance should be predicated on informed judgments based on the monitoring of a set of indicators in conjunction with a flexible inflation objective as the nominal anchor. This paper relates to the 2010 OECD Economic Review of China (www.oecd.org/eco/surveys/china).
Mots-clés:
China, macroeconomic policies, money, regulation
Classification JEL:
  • E4: Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics / Money and Interest Rates
  • E5: Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics / Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
  • E6: Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics / Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook
  • K2: Law and Economics / Regulation and Business Law
  • L5: Industrial Organization / Regulation and Industrial Policy