OECD Journal: Economic Studies

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OECD Economic Studies
Frequency :
Annuel
ISSN :
1995-2856 (en ligne)
ISSN :
1995-2848 (imprimé)
DOI :
10.1787/19952856
Cacher / Voir l'abstract

OECD Journal: Economic Studies publishes articles in the area of economic policy analysis, applied economics and statistical analysis, generally with an international or cross-country dimension. While it draws significantly on economic papers produced by the Economics Department and other parts of the OECD Secretariat for the Organisation’s intergovernmental committees, the submission of articles produced by non-OECD authors is encouraged. We also welcome comments on articles previously published in the journal. Now published as part of the OECD Journal package.

Article
 

Public Policies and Investment in Network Infrastructure You do not have access to this content

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Auteur(s):
Douglas Sutherland, Sónia Araújo, Balázs Égert, Tomasz Kozluk
Date de publication
09 déc 2011
Pages
6
Bibliographic information
N°:
6,
Volume:
2011,
Numéro:
1
Pages
1–23
DOI
10.1787/eco_studies-2011-5kg51mlvk6r6

Cacher / Voir l'abstract

How can public policy influence investment in infrastructure in network industries? Network industries rely mainly on fixed networks to deliver services, with investment being lumpy and largely irreversible. As a result, public policies – such as public provision, the introduction of competition and the regulatory environment – can potentially have an important impact on investment behaviour, with the net effect depending on the extent that policies boost socially-productive investment or reduce inefficient investment. Drawing on responses to a unique questionnaire assessing public policy in the network sectors, the information in this paper presents a systematic picture of relevant policies in place across OECD countries. Econometric analysis – both at the sectoral and firm level – finds that public policies can have significant quantitative effects. In particular, the introduction of competitive pressures through the reduction of barriers to entry and the combination of regulator independence and incentive regulation can promote investment in the sector.