OECD Statistics Working Papers

ISSN :
1815-2031 (en ligne)
DOI :
10.1787/18152031
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The OECD Statistics Working Paper Series - managed by the OECD Statistics Directorate – is designed to make available in a timely fashion and to a wider readership selected studies prepared by staff in the Secretariat or by outside consultants working on OECD projects. The papers included are of a technical, methodological or statistical policy nature and relate to statistical work relevant to the organisation. The Working Papers are generally available only in their original language - English or French - with a summary in the other.

Joint Working Papers
Measuring Well-being and Progress in Countries at Different Stages of Development: Towards a More Universal Conceptual Framework (with OECD Development Centre)

 

Linking Policies to Well-Being Outcomes Through Micro-Simulation You or your institution have access to this content

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Auteur(s):
Michael Wolfson1
Author Affiliations
  • 1: University of Ottawa, Canada

Date de publication
21 nov 2011
Bibliographic information
No:
2011/08
Pages
26
DOI
10.1787/5kg1zq0qwmf1-en

Cacher / Voir l'abstract

A major challenge in the measurement of well-being and progress is to link indicators of high-level societal outcomes with specific policy interventions. This is important not only for better informing the public, but also to provide the means for policy makers and advisors to assess the impacts of their policies and programmes and to increase their effectiveness and cost-efficiency. This paper looks at four major areas of social policies– health status, literacy and learning, economic security, and economic inequality– with the aim of understanding how to link broad outcome measures of progress in these areas, on the one hand, and the policies bearing on them, on the other. Emphasis is given to the powerful benefits to be derived from coupling longitudinal, multivariate data and powerful statistical methods with recently developed analytical tools such as micro-simulation. The paper also emphasises the need for "principled" summary indicators, i.e. indicators embedded within coherent data systems, and the importance of internationally comparable data based on common concepts and definitions.