OECD Economics Department Working Papers

ISSN :
1815-1973 (en ligne)
DOI :
10.1787/18151973
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Working papers from the Economics Department of the OECD that cover the full range of the Department’s work including the economic situation, policy analysis and projections; fiscal policy, public expenditure and taxation; and structural issues including ageing, growth and productivity, migration, environment, human capital, housing, trade and investment, labour markets, regulatory reform, competition, health, and other issues.

The views expressed in these papers are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of the OECD or of the governments of its member countries.

 

How to Move Product Market Regulation in New Zealand Back Towards the Frontier You or your institution have access to this content

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Auteur(s):
Paul Conway
Date de publication
13 jui 2011
Bibliographic information
N°:
880
Pages
42
DOI
10.1787/5kg89j3gd2r8-en

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From the mid-1980s, New Zealand was widely considered to be a leader in liberalising product market regulation (PMR). However, the reform of PMR has lost momentum over recent years. Many areas of PMR are still consistent with best practice, but New Zealand is no longer assessed to be at the forefront of regulatory policy making. Although economic geography clearly offers a partial explanation for the relative underperformance of the NZ economy, restrictive policies in some areas are also likely to be constraining growth in GDP per capita. Indeed, it is likely that being small and distant exacerbates the negative impact of restrictive product market policies on New Zealand’s economic performance. This implies a genuine need to shift the regulatory framework back towards the OECD frontier. Ongoing improvements in regulatory governance, minimising the government’s influence in competitive markets and lowering barriers to trade and FDI, including ongoing policy harmonisation and mutual recognition with trading partners where appropriate, would all help in this regard. This Working Paper relates to the 2011 Economic Survey of New Zealand (www.oecd.org/eco/surveys/NewZealand).
Mots-clés:
indicators, product market regulation, productivity, New Zealand, institutions
Classification JEL:
  • D: Microeconomics
  • D04: Microeconomics / General / Microeconomic Policy: Formulation; Implementation; Evaluation
  • D24: Microeconomics / Production and Organizations / Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
  • K23: Law and Economics / Regulation and Business Law / Regulated Industries and Administrative Law
  • L11: Industrial Organization / Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance / Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms
  • L12: Industrial Organization / Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance / Monopoly; Monopolization Strategies
  • L25: Industrial Organization / Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior / Firm Performance: Size, Diversification, and Scope
  • L43: Industrial Organization / Antitrust Issues and Policies / Legal Monopolies and Regulation or Deregulation
  • L5: Industrial Organization / Regulation and Industrial Policy