OECD Statistics Working Papers

ISSN :
1815-2031 (en ligne)
DOI :
10.1787/18152031
Cacher / Voir l'abstract
The OECD Statistics Working Paper Series - managed by the OECD Statistics Directorate – is designed to make available in a timely fashion and to a wider readership selected studies prepared by staff in the Secretariat or by outside consultants working on OECD projects. The papers included are of a technical, methodological or statistical policy nature and relate to statistical work relevant to the organisation. The Working Papers are generally available only in their original language - English or French - with a summary in the other.

Joint working paper with OECD Development Centre.

 

Hedonic Price Indexes for Housing You or your institution have access to this content

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Auteur(s):
Robert Hill1
Author Affiliations
  • 1: University of Graz, Autriche

Date de publication
04 fév 2011
Bibliographic information
No:
2011/01
Pages
66
DOI
10.1787/5kghzxpt6g6f-en

Cacher / Voir l'abstract

Every house is different. It is important that house price indexes take account of these quality differences. Hedonic methods which express house prices as a function of a vector of characteristics (such as number of bedrooms and bathrooms, land area and location) are particularly useful for this purpose. In this report I consider some of the developments in the hedonic methodology, as it is applied in a housing context, that have occurred in the last three decades. A number of hedonic house price indexes are now available. However, it is often difficult to see how these indexes relate to each other. For this reason the paper attempts to impose some structure on the literature by developing a taxonomy of hedonic methods, and then show how existing methods fit into this taxonomy. Also discussed are some promising areas for future research in the hedonic field, particularly the use of geospatial data and nonparametric methods for better capturing the impact of location on house prices. The main criticisms of the hedonic approach are evaluated and compared with the repeat sales and stratified median methods. The overall conclusion is that the advantages of the hedonic approach outweigh its disadvantages.