OECD Economics Department Working Papers

ISSN :
1815-1973 (en ligne)
DOI :
10.1787/18151973
Cacher / Voir l'abstract
Working papers from the Economics Department of the OECD that cover the full range of the Department’s work including the economic situation, policy analysis and projections; fiscal policy, public expenditure and taxation; and structural issues including ageing, growth and productivity, migration, environment, human capital, housing, trade and investment, labour markets, regulatory reform, competition, health, and other issues.

The views expressed in these papers are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of the OECD or of the governments of its member countries.

 

Boosting Productivity in Australia You or your institution have access to this content

Cliquez pour accéder: 
Auteur(s):
Vassiliki Koutsogeorgopoulou1, Omar Barbiero2
Author Affiliations
  • 1: OCDE, France

  • 2: Bocconi University, Italie

Date de publication
18 fév 2013
Bibliographic information
N°:
1025
Pages
59
DOI
10.1787/5k4c0vt9xhf3-en

Cacher / Voir l'abstract

Australia’s productivity growth has decelerated markedly around the turn of the century. Part of the decline is probably temporary, but raising multifactor productivity is key to ensure that living standards continue to grow strongly, especially if the currently strong terms of trade weaken over time. Recent efforts by the government are welcome. Ensuring responsive, high quality, vocational and higher education systems is indispensable to long-term growth. Raising the completion rate of vocational students, and enhancing the level of collaboration among the key innovation players are priorities. The productivityenhancing effects of infrastructure could be boosted by more effective and strategic planning, new sources of funding, and better use of existing capacity. Efficient pricing for infrastructure services and rapid progress towards harmonisation of regulations across states would boost competition and productivity.
Mots-clés:
regulation, infrastructure, innovation, vocational training, transport, water, Australia, productivity, education, energy, higher education, user charges, public-private partnerships, multifactor productivity
Classification JEL:
  • H43: Public Economics / Publicly Provided Goods / Project Evaluation; Social Discount Rate
  • I21: Health, Education, and Welfare / Education and Research Institutions / Analysis of Education
  • L51: Industrial Organization / Regulation and Industrial Policy / Economics of Regulation
  • L91: Industrial Organization / Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities / Transportation: General
  • L94: Industrial Organization / Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities / Electric Utilities
  • O3: Economic Development, Technological Change, and Growth / Technological Change; Research and Development; Intellectual Property Rights
  • O4: Economic Development, Technological Change, and Growth / Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity
  • Q15: Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics / Agriculture / Land Ownership and Tenure; Land Reform; Land Use; Irrigation; Agriculture and Environment