Pension Reform in the Baltic Countries
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Pension Reform in the Baltic Countries

Reform of the pension regime is continually evolving in the Baltic countries.  This publication contains individual country reports, comparative analysis from a regional perspective and examines key policy issues in the private pension sector.  It includes perspectives on these issues debated during the Pension Conference organised by the OECD in co-operation with the EU in April 2003 in Tallinn, Estonia.  The analyses benefit from in-depth knowledge of OECD experience in these sectors, as well as from experience in other emerging market economies.

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Publication Date :
08 Apr 2004
DOI :
10.1787/9789264021068-en
 
Chapter
 

The Development of Private Pensions in Lithuania You do not have access to this content

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Author(s):
Teodoras Medaiskis, Audrone Morkuniene
Pages :
147–178
DOI :
10.1787/9789264021068-6-en

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The Lithuanian pension system experienced two major reforms, one in 1995, which introduced social insurance principles, and a second one in 2000 which established a voluntary funded pension pillar. Strict regulatory measures, an unfavourable tax regime, and high social security contributions largely explain the failure to attract investors in fund management companies. After a long debate, a new law was approved in December 2002 to be implemented in January 2004. Workers will be able to choose between making their full social contribution to the PAYG tier and diverting part of it (up to 2.5% of their salary in the first year, increasing up to 5.5% in later years) to mandatory pension funds and specific life insurance contracts...