International Investment Perspectives 2006
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International Investment Perspectives 2006

This annual report reviews recent developments in international direct investment, includes recent statistics and highlights policy responses that will help countries reap the full benefits of investment.  This edition's special focus is on legal and policy issues arising from international investment agreements.  The articles in this section investigate novel features of recent bilateral investment treaties; options for improving the system of investor-state dispute settlement; and the consolidation of claims as an avenue for improving investment arbitration.   Other articles in this volume cover how new technologies are a force advancing the closer integration of national economies;  the challenges and opportunities for policy makers that arise from international investor participation in infrastructure; recent evidence of source (or "home") country benefits of outward direct investment; and the role of the OECD peer review process in building investment policy capacity.
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Chapter
 

International Investor Participation in Infrastructure

Challenges for Policy Makers You do not have access to this content

English
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Author(s):
OECD

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The main success and failure stories of international investor participation in infrastructure over the past decade are enumerated in a rich body of literature. A number of challenges for policy makers and businesses can be identified from this body of evidence, including pieces of supplementary analysis made available by the Investment Committee’s Secretariat, which were discussed with infrastructure specialists at an Expert Meeting on 3 March 2006. Some of the tentative lessons are summarised in this article. The success of infrastructure projects depends on the general political, regulatory and economic reality in which they are set. International investor participation in infrastructure should be seen as a long-term commitment to provide end-consumers in the host country with services. Government, in its capacity of a contracting party, acts as proxy for these consumers’ interests, and it partners with the private sector in delivering the services. Responsible business conduct is a key challenge for international investors participating in infrastructure. This is particularly in developing countries, where enabling environments tend to be less developed, and governments’ relative bargaining positions vis-à-vis international enterprises weaker.
 
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