OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals, Section 4

Health Effects

ISSN :
2074-5788 (online)
DOI :
10.1787/20745788
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The OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals is a collection of about 150 of the most relevant internationally agreed testing methods used by government, industry and independent laboratories to identify and characterise potential hazards of chemicals. They are a set of tools for professionals, used primarily in regulatory safety testing and subsequent chemical and chemical product notification, chemical registration and in chemical evaluation. They can also be used for the selection and ranking of candidate chemicals during the development of new chemicals and products and in toxicology research. This group of tests covers health effects.

Also available in: French
 
Test No. 439: In Vitro Skin Irritation

Test No. 439: In Vitro Skin Irritation

Reconstructed Human Epidermis Test Method You or your institution have access to this content

Author(s):
OECD
Publication Date :
23 July 2010
Pages :
18
DOI :
10.1787/9789264090958-en

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This Test Guideline describes an in vitro procedure that may be used for the hazard identification of irritant chemicals (substances and mixtures) in accordance with the UN Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling (GHS) Category 2.  It is based on reconstructed human epidermis (RhE), which in its overall design closely mimics the biochemical and physiological properties of the upper parts of the human skin. Cell viability is measured by enzymatic conversion of the vital dye MTT into a blue formazan salt that is quantitatively measured after extraction from tissues. Irritant test substances are identified by their ability to decrease cell viability below defined threshold levels (below or equal to 50% for UN GHS Category 2). This Test Guideline also includes a set of Performance Standards for the assessment of similar and modified RhE-based test methods. There are three validated test methods that adhere to this Test Guideline. Depending on the regulatory framework and the classification system in use, this procedure may be used to determine the skin irritancy of test substances as a stand-alone replacement test for in vivo skin irritation testing, or as a partial replacement test, within a tiered testing strategy.

Also available in: French