OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals, Section 4

Health Effects

ISSN :
2074-5788 (online)
DOI :
10.1787/20745788
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The OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals is a collection of about 150 of the most relevant internationally agreed testing methods used by government, industry and independent laboratories to identify and characterise potential hazards of chemicals. They are a set of tools for professionals, used primarily in regulatory safety testing and subsequent chemical and chemical product notification, chemical registration and in chemical evaluation. They can also be used for the selection and ranking of candidate chemicals during the development of new chemicals and products and in toxicology research. This group of tests covers health effects.

Also available in: French
 
Test No. 430: In Vitro Skin Corrosion: Transcutaneous Electrical Resistance Test (TER)

Test No. 430: In Vitro Skin Corrosion: Transcutaneous Electrical Resistance Test (TER) You or your institution have access to this content

Author(s):
OECD
Publication Date :
23 Nov 2004
Pages :
12
DOI :
10.1787/9789264071124-en

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The Globally Harmonised System for the Classification and Labelling of Chemicals defines skin corrosion as the production of irreversible tissue damage in the skin following the application of a test material.

The test material (150 µL for liquids or solid with 150 µL of deionised water added on the top) is applied for up to 24 hours to the epidermal surfaces of skin discs (three skin discs are used for each test and control substance) in a two-compartment test system in which the skin discs function as the separation between the compartments. The skin discs are taken from humanely killed rats aged 28-30 days. Corrosive materials are identified by their ability to produce a loss of normal stratum corneum integrity and barrier function, which is measured as a reduction in the TER below a threshold level (5kΩ for rat). A dye-binding step incorporated into the test procedure permits to determine if the increase in ionic permeability is due to physical destruction of the stratum corneum.

Also available in: French