Nordic workshop on action related to Short-lived Climate Forcers
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Nordic workshop on action related to Short-lived Climate Forcers

Organised by the Nordic Council of Ministers Climate and Air Quality Group

Nordic Ministers of Environment adopted in March 2012 the “Svalbard Declaration” with decisions to reduce the negative impacts of the climate changes and air pollution caused by the emission of the so-called Short-lived Climate Forcers (SLCFs) such as black carbon (soot) and methane. Along with CO2, they are the main reasons why the ice in the Arctic now is melting rapidly.  At a workshop organised by the Nordic Group on Climate and Air Quality in June 2012 researchers and policy-makers discussed the recent scientific findings, the national experiences with emission inventories, identification of cost-effective measures to cut emissions and the drawing up of national action plans as well as the development in the field of international co-operation on SLCFs. The report presents policy recommendations, conclusions and recommendations on scientific research and monitoring.

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Soot and other SLCFs in the Arctic Atmosphere (AMAP) You do not have access to this content

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Author(s):
Nordic Council of Ministers

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The rising global temperature is of increasing concern among scientist, politicians and the general public. In the Arctic, the temperature increase since the start of the last century has been twice as high as the increase in the global average temperature (www.noaa.gov). As a consequence, the polar sea ice has been retreating. Today, more than 40% of summer sea ice has disappeared, and the distribution between multiyear ice and seasonal ice has changed dramatically. This has significant consequences for the physical and chemical processes in the Arctic, and is also changing the living conditions [1].