OECD Green Growth Papers

ISSN :
2226-0935 (online)
DOI :
10.1787/22260935
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The OECD Green Growth Strategy, launched in May 2011, provides concrete recommendations and measurement tools to support countries’ efforts to achieve economic growth and development, while at the same time ensure that natural assets continue to provide the ecosystems services on which our well-being relies. The strategy proposes a flexible policy framework that can be tailored to different country circumstances and stages of development. OECD Green Growth Papers complement the OECD Green Growth Studies series, and aim to stimulate discussion and analysis on specific topics and obtain feedback from interested audiences.
 

Making Growth Green and Inclusive: The Case of Ethiopia You or your institution have access to this content

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Author(s):
Steve Bass1, Shannon Siyao Wang2, Tadele Ferede3, Daniel Fikreyesus4
Author Affiliations
  • 1: International Institute for Environment and Development, United Kingdom

  • 2: OECD, France

  • 3: Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia

  • 4: Echnoserve, Ethiopia

Publication Date
05 June 2013
Bibliographic information
No:
2013/07
Pages
42
DOI
10.1787/5k46dbzhrkhl-en

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Ethiopian society, economy and environment are so intimately interlinked that systematic attention is essential if clashes are to be resolved and synergies realised. For example, the majority of poor people are principally dependent on agriculture but, in turn, society is dependent on farmers managing land well to sustain water supplies, biodiversity and other environmental services. Such relationships are dynamic and increasingly intense: climate change, rising population, resource scarcities and price volatilities put them all under pressure. An integrated perspective that works operationally is needed – one that makes economic, social and environmental sense and that inspires stakeholders. The holistic approach that the Ethiopian Government has recently developed aims to tackle the problems inherent in growth paths that produce environmental problems, and to realise potentials from investing in Ethiopia’s natural assets. For example, the country’s agricultural products and potential for green hydroelectric power are unique attributes that could drive development in ways that are environmentally sound and provide new jobs and satisfying livelihoods...