OECD Green Growth Papers

ISSN :
2226-0935 (online)
DOI :
10.1787/22260935
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The OECD Green Growth Strategy, launched in May 2011, provides concrete recommendations and measurement tools to support countries’ efforts to achieve economic growth and development, while at the same time ensure that natural assets continue to provide the ecosystems services on which our well-being relies. The strategy proposes a flexible policy framework that can be tailored to different country circumstances and stages of development. OECD Green Growth Papers complement the OECD Green Growth Studies series, and aim to stimulate discussion and analysis on specific topics and obtain feedback from interested audiences.
 

Making Growth Green and Inclusive: The Case of Cambodia You or your institution have access to this content

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Author(s):
Essam Yassin Mohammed1, Shannon Wang2, Gary Kawaguchi3
Author Affiliations
  • 1: International Institute for Environment and Development, United Kingdom

  • 2: OECD, France

  • 3: Pannasastra University of Cambodia, Cambodia

Publication Date
12 Aug 2013
Bibliographic information
No:
2013/08
Pages
44
DOI
10.1787/5k420651szzr-en

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Developing countries have collectively displayed relatively high growth rates in the last decade. Although large disparities still persist in standards of living, low and middle income countries averaged economic growth of 6.2% between 2000 and 2008, pulling 325 million people out of poverty (World Bank, 2010). Global growth has been accompanied by environmental degradation and in some cases there are growing numbers of people still living in poverty. Key questions for development planning today in countries include: Can developing countries strike a balance between economic growth, societal well-being and environmental protection? Can inclusive, green growth be a way forward? This report presents a case study on Cambodia designed to answer these questions. The case study draws on several sources of information to compile a "snapshot" of the situation today. In particular, qualitative information was gathered through a two-day, multi-stakeholder workshop and through bilateral interviews conducted with relevant actors from both public and private sectors. It also draws on relevant literature to present a balanced picture of the state of play on green growth in Cambodia.