For a richer future
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For a richer future

13 conventions on the natural and cultural environment

The Nordic countries have a long tradition for participating in the international collaboration for conserving the world's natural and cultural heritage. Conventions are an important tool in connection with this collaboration. This booklet describes 13 of the most important conventions that involve the Nordic countries in different ways - and which the Nordic countries in many cases have helped prepare. These conventions are: - Biodiversity Convention - CITES Convention - Ramsar Convention - Bern Convention - Bonn Convention - Whaling Convention - Helsinki Convention - OSPAR Convention - World Heritage Convention - European Landscape Convention - Granada Convention - Malta Convention and - Aarhus Convention There is a short description of the historical background for the conventions. The most important provisions and their relevance to the Nordic countries are also described. In addition, the booklet contains a summary of which Nordic coun-tries have adopted the individual conventions and references to sources of further information. The target group comprises politicians, civil servants, administrators, teachers, interest organisations and others who are interested in the natural and cultural heritage.

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Whaling Convention You do not have access to this content

English
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Author(s):
Nordic Council of Ministers

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In the 1930s, several nations hunted whales intensively. As a result, there was a great risk that whales would be become extinct. To conserve the stocks, Norway and Britain agreed as early as 1931 to limit whaling. More countries joined the agreement in 1937, but it was not very effective, as new whaling nations continued to arise. There was a need for new regulations, and that was the reason why 15 whaling nations adopted the Whaling Convention in 1946. At the end of the 1970s and the start of the 1980s, several new countries joined the Whaling Convention.