Energy
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Energy

The OECD Green Growth Strategy aims to provide concrete recommendations and measurement tools, including indicators, to support countries’ efforts to achieve economic growth and development, while ensuring that natural assets continue to provide the resources and environmental services on which well-being relies. The strategy proposes a flexible policy framework that can be tailored to different country circumstances and stages of development. This report was coordinated with the International Energy Agency (IEA).

This report looks at the role of the energy sector in moving towards a green growth model and the policies to facilitate the transition.  Together with innovation,  going green can be a long-term driver for economic growth, through, for example, investing in renewable energy and improved efficiency in the use of energy and materials. 

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Monitoring progress towards green growth You do not have access to this content

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Author(s):
OECD

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Developing and implementing green growth policies in the energy sector requires appropriate information and indicators to support policy design and analysis and monitor progress. The OECD has developed a conceptual framework for monitoring progress towards green growth. While the set of indicators is still being refined, indicators pertinent to the energy sector are those that measure the carbon-productivity or intensity of energy production and consumption, energy intensity and efficiency, "clean" energy-related research and development and patents, as well as measures of energy related taxes and subsidies.
This needs to be complemented with (i) end-use indicators that help policy makers understand how users will respond to changes in energy prices, income, technology, energy efficiency, production patterns, and lifestyle, (ii) additional energy-environment indicators, and with indicators characterising the level of access to energy.
While energy statistics are well established in countries and at international level, measuring energy efficiency and innovation is difficult, and coherent industry level information is scarce. More needs to be done to improve data quality, methodologies and definitions, and to link the data to economic information.
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