OECD/IEA Climate Change Expert Group Papers

ISSN :
2227-779X (online)
DOI :
10.1787/2227779x
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This series is designed to make available to a wider readership selected papers on climate change issues that have been prepared for the OECD/IEA Climate Change Expert Group (CCXG). The CCXG (formerly called the Annex I Expert Group) is a group of government delegates from OECD and other industrialised countries. The aim of the group is to promote dialogue and enhance understanding on technical issues in the international climate change negotiations. CCXG papers are developed in consultation with experts from a wide range of developed and developing countries, including those participating in CCXG Global Forums.

The full papers are generally available only in English.

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Comparing Definitions and Methods to Estimate Mobilised Climate Finance You or your institution have access to this content

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Author(s):
Randy Caruso1, Jane Ellis1
Author Affiliations
  • 1: OECD, France

Publication Date
01 May 2013
Bibliographic information
No:
2013/02
Pages
56
DOI
10.1787/5k44wj0s6fq2-en

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At the 16th Conference of the Parties (COP) in 2010, developed countries formalised a collective climate finance commitment made previously in Copenhagen of "mobilising jointly USD 100 billion per year by 2020 to address the needs of developing countries...from a wide variety of sources, public and private, bilateral and multilateral, including alternative sources" (UNFCCC, 2010). However, there is currently no definition of which "climate" activities, flows, or other interventions could count towards the USD 100 billion; what "mobilising" means; or even which countries are covered by this commitment. The paper examines different definitions used by 24 key actors in climate finance to quantify the level of private climate finance mobilised by their interventions, as well as the methods used to track such private climate finance. Key findings are that i) methodologies to assess and estimate mobilisation vary widely, and ii) considerable risk of double-counting exists.
Keywords:
MRV, tracking, mobilise, leverage, climate finance
JEL Classification:
  • F21: International Economics / International Factor Movements and International Business / International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
  • F53: International Economics / International Relations and International Political Economy / International Agreements and Observance; International Organizations
  • G23: Financial Economics / Financial Institutions and Services / Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors
  • O13: Economic Development, Technological Change, and Growth / Economic Development / Agriculture; Natural Resources; Energy; Environment; Other Primary Products
  • O16: Economic Development, Technological Change, and Growth / Economic Development / Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
  • O19: Economic Development, Technological Change, and Growth / Economic Development / International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations
  • Q54: Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics / Environmental Economics / Climate; Natural Disasters; Global Warming
  • Q56: Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics / Environmental Economics / Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
  • Q58: Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics / Environmental Economics / Government Policy