Energy Policies of IEA Countries

International Energy Agency

English
ISSN: 
1990-0082 (online)
ISSN: 
1021-3872 (print)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/19900082
Hide / Show Abstract

This series consists of two components. The first is an annual compilation by the International Energy Agency containing a broad analysis of recent trends and an easily accessible overview of energy policy during the last 12 months along with summaries of individual country reports done during the period. It also presents the major findings of the latest World Energy Outlook, key statistical information and brief summaries of major IEA publications released during the past year. The second component is the set of country reviews produced each year. IEA countries are on a five-year review cycle, which means that approximately five countries are reviewed in detail each year and published as part of the Energy Policies of IEA Countries series.

 
Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Belgium 2016

Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Belgium 2016 You do not have access to this content

International Energy Agency

English
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/6116081e.pdf
  • PDF
Author(s):
IEA
19 May 2016
Pages:
178
ISBN:
9789264258099 (PDF)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264258099-en

Hide / Show Abstract

In recent years, Belgium has made clear progress in increasing competition in the electricity and natural gas markets. It has also managed to reduce the use of fossil fuels and increase the use of renewable energy. The country´s economy is becoming less energy intensive.

Belgium has excellent gas transport infrastructure, and its gas market is well-integrated with those of its neighbours. The country’s emergency oil stock levels are also high.

As in all IEA member countries, a major challenge for Belgium is to decarbonise the economy while ensuring security of supply and affordability of energy. A long-term approach is required, and, given that responsibility for energy policy is divided between the federal and regional governments, the authorities must work decisively together to form a national energy strategy.

Nuclear energy accounts for around half of Belgium’s electricity generation. The current policy is to close all nuclear power plants between 2022 and 2025, but this would seriously challenge Belgium’s efforts to ensure electricity security and provide affordable low-carbon electricity. The phase-out schedule should be relaxed to let the plants run as long as the regulator considers them safe.

To attract critical investments in the energy sector – especially in electricity generation – the government should follow closely the principles of transparency, predictability and regulatory certainty.

Under any scenario, energy supply needs to be further diversified and energy demand further limited. Transport and buildings hold a large potential for efficiency and climate gains, and fiscal incentives and price signals could be used more frequently in order to reap them.

loader image
 
Visit the OECD web site