Women in Scientific Careers
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Women in Scientific Careers

Unleashing the Potential

While women account for more than half of university graduates in several OECD countries, they receive only 30% of tertiary degrees granted in science and engineering fields. This publication presents the proceedings of a recent international workshop to assess the underlying causes behind the low participation of women in scientific careers, especially at senior levels, and to identify good practice policies to attract, recruit and retain women in scientific careers in public and private research.
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/9206061e.pdf
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Publication Date :
13 Nov 2006
DOI :
10.1787/9789264025387-en
 
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Part 5. Conclusion You do not have access to this content

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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/9206061ec006.pdf
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Author(s):
Maria Stratigaki
Pages :
219–223
DOI :
10.1787/9789264025387-6-en

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I thank you for the invitation to participate in the concluding panel of this workshop, which I found very interesting and very encouraging for future OECD action in this field. Being the only person from academia on this panel, I would like to take the opportunity to highlight for the audience of policy makers (representatives of OECD member states) some aspects of the problem of women’s under-representation in research and science. I examine them in the light of findings from women’s and gender studies in the scientific and technological fields. I believe that policy making can greatly benefit from knowledge produced in universities that enables it to improve its efficiency.