Positive Factors at Work
Hide / Show Abstract

Positive Factors at Work

The First Report of the Nordic Project

Positive psychology investigates the positive aspects of human life. Positive psychologists contend that it is difficult to understand the factors that create health, balance and meaningful lives through studying sickness, dissatisfaction and suffering. Accordingly, positive psychology represents a turn for a more positive approach to psychology. The ideas of positive psychology are also applicable within the sphere of work and organisational psychology. It is a central contention of this report that positive psychology may provide interesting answers to some of the challenges that are confronting the Nordic welfare states in the years ahead. The aim of this report is to give a theoretical and methodological overview of existing Nordic research about positive factors at work. The report contains a series of operationalised concepts that measure positive factors at work. These measures of positive factors at work are brought together in a theoretical model that the authors of this report will use as a starting point for further research into positive psychology at work in a Nordic context. This research has been funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers.

Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/3808111e.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/employment/positive-factors-at-work_tn2008-501
  • READ
 
Chapter
 

Abstract You do not have access to this content

English
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/3808111ec003.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/employment/positive-factors-at-work/abstract_9789289333962-3-en
  • READ
Author(s):
Nordic Council of Ministers

Hide / Show Abstract

The report is based on the project ‘Positive factors at work’ financed by the Nordic Council of Ministers. The project is a joint venture project between the Nordic countries of Norway (Department of Psychology at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology; The Norwegian Business School), Sweden (Department of Psychology at the University of Stockholm), Denmark (The National Research Centre for the Working Environment in Denmark), and Finland (The Finnish Institute of Occupational Health).