OECD Reviews on Local Job Creation

English
ISSN: 
2311-2336 (online)
ISSN: 
2311-2328 (print)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/23112336
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With the rising economic importance of human resources and skills, employment and training agencies are now often expected to play a more important role in local strategies to support new job creation, facilitate restructuring and increase productivity. The OECD Local Economic and Employment Development (LEED) Programme has developed a series of Reviews on Local Job Creation to examine the contribution of local labour market policy to boosting quality employment and enhancing productivity.

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Employment and Skills Strategies in Saskatchewan and the Yukon, Canada

Employment and Skills Strategies in Saskatchewan and the Yukon, Canada You do not have access to this content

English
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Author(s):
OECD
12 Sep 2016
Pages:
132
ISBN:
9789264259218 (PDF) ; 9789264259225 (EPUB) ;9789264259201(print)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264259225-en

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This report looks at a range of local employment and economic development issues in Saskatchewan and the Yukon, Canada, with a focus on indigenous peoples. The report provides a comparative framework to understand the role of the local level in contributing to more and better quality jobs, and practical recommendations to help federal, provincial/territorial, and local policy makers in Canada build effective and sustainable partnerships that join-up efforts across employment, training, and economic development policies. Co-ordinated policies can help workers find suitable jobs, while also stimulating entrepreneurship and productivity, which increases the quality of life and prosperity within a community as well as throughout the country.

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  • Foreword

    This review has been written by the Local Economic and Employment Development (LEED) Programme of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) as part of a project undertaken in co-operation with Employment and Social Development Canada, the Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities and the Saskatchewan Ministry of the Economy and Yukon’s Department of Education. This project is part of the OECD LEED programme of work under the leadership of Sylvain Giguère, Head of Division, who reviewed this report.

  • Acronyms and abbreviations
  • Executive summary

    While Canada has experienced a fairly solid labour market recovery, prospects for growth remain cloudy due to volatility from low oil prices and increasing household debt. Demographic pressures require productivity improvements in the economy and a need to make better use of the existing skills of the workforce. Employment and skills policies are critical levers in boosting economic development opportunities but effective implementation requires strong capacity at the local level.

  • Reader's guide

    The Local Job Creation project involves a series of country reviews in Australia, Belgium (Flanders), Canada (Ontario, Quebec, Saskatchewan, and the Yukon), Czech Republic, France, Ireland, Israel, Italy (Autonomous Province of Trento), Korea, Poland, Slovenia, Sweden, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States (California and Michigan). The key stages of each review are summarised in .

  • Policy context for employment and skills in Canada

    Among OECD countries, Canada’s economy weathered the economic crisis relatively well but has faced recent uncertainty as a result of volatility in oil prices. While Canada has a solid foundation of skills upon which to build future growth, demographic pressures will require the country to make better use of the skills of the existing workforce to enhance productivity. This chapter provides an overview of key economic and employment trends in Canada, including a focus on key labour market challenges facing Indigenous Peoples.

  • Canadian federal employment policies and programmes

    Employment and Social Development is the main department responsible for employment and skills policies in Canada. They work with other federal departments and provincial/territorial governments to implement a number of policies and programmes across Canada. Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada plays a significant role in the management of employment and economic development policies targeted to Indigenous Peoples in Canada. This chapter provides an overview of key employment and skills programmes at the federal level, including those which are targeted to Indigenous Peoples.

  • Saskatchewan's employment and skills system

    This chapter provides an overview of key employment and skills policies in Saskatchewan. The Ministry of the Economy plays a key role in the overall management of employment and economic development policies while the Ministry of Advanced Education takes the lead role in the formulation of training and skills programmes. Both ministries work with other provincial level ministries and local delivery organisations to grow the province’s economy.

  • Yukon's employment and skills system

    This chapter provides an overview of key actors within the Yukon’s employment and skill system. The Department of Education plays a lead role in the development and delivery of employment programmes in the Yukon. Many of the department’s recent activities were driven from the conclusion of a Labour Market Framework, which covers a number of important policy areas for employment and economic development.

  • Overview of the case study areas in Saskatchewan and Yukon

    This chapter provides a labour market and economic overview of the four case study regions as well as a description of their employment and training services. It also presents the results from an OECD LEED statistical tool which looks at the relationship between skills supply and demand at the sub-national level. To better understand the role of the local level in contributing to job creation and productivity, this study examines local activities in four case study areas across Saskatchewan and Yukon: 1) Whitecap Dakota First Nation; 2) Regina; 3) Whitehorse; and 4) Dawson City.

  • Key findings from the OECD Local Job Creation Dashboard

    This chapter highlights findings from the local job creation dashboard in Saskatchewan and the Yukon. The findings are discussed through the four thematic areas of the study: 1) better aligning policies and programmes to local employment development; 2) adding value through skills; 3) targeting policy to local employment sectors and investing in quality jobs; and 4) being inclusive.

  • Towards an action plan for jobs: Recommendations for better supporting local employment and economic development

    Stimulating job creation at the local level requires integrated actions across employment, training, and economic development portfolios. Co-ordinated place based policies can help workers find suitable jobs, while also contributing to demand by stimulating productivity. This requires flexible policy management frameworks, information, and integrated partnerships which leverage the efforts of local stakeholders. This chapter outlines the key recommendations emerging from the review of local job creation policies in Canada, including Saskatchewan and the Yukon.

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