A matter of health and job satisfaction
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A matter of health and job satisfaction

Seniors, work and retirement in the Nordic region

In all the Nordic countries there is a declared policy of increasing work participation among seniors. The most important reason comes from a more long-term population, generation and welfare perspective: gradually, as more and more older people live longer, it is becoming increasingly expensive for younger age groups to finance and maintain relatively generous welfare schemes. The report a matter of health and job satisfaction compares and analyses the situation of seniors on the labour market in the Nordic countries as well as pension and social insurance systems. Seven in ten seniors aged 50-64 are in work, while three in ten have either retired early or are on the way out of working life. Impaired health and capacity for work represent the most important ”exit route”, followed by voluntary, flexible pensions, unemployment and working environment. Other causes include formal and informal barriers and age discrimination. People are different, seniors not least. Health, duties and working environment are crucial to more seniors being able and wanting to work for longer, in addition to which they want to be seen, made use of and appreciated!

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Demographics, participation in working life and retirement among seniors You do not have access to this content

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Author(s):
Nordic Council of Ministers

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In both the Nordic region and the rest of Europe we are faced with an “ageing population” trend. More of us are older people and older people who are living longer. The ratio between the number of people aged 65+ and the number of adults aged 20–64 in the population is growing. Such “old age dependency rates” in the Nordic countries are expected to increase from 20–30% in 2010 to 35–50% in 2030 and around 40–55% in 2050. The increase will therefore be sharpest in the next 20 years as the large birth cohorts from after World War II gradually grow old. A relatively high birth rate will, however, contribute to a better age balance over time in the Nordic countries than in many other countries in Europe. Life expectancy is also increasing more in many other countries in Europe. Nor is this anything new: historically there have also been major changes in population make-up over time. The health of seniors and older people is also improving overall. The majority of seniors can expect to live quite a long time, for the most part in good health.

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