World Education Indicators 2005
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World Education Indicators 2005

Education Trends in Perspective

This publication provides a range of comparable, cross-national education indicators for 19 middle-income non-OECD countries comprising over 50 per cent of the world population.  In particular, it examines the extent to which countries were able to widen participation in higher levels of education between 1995 and 2002/3. Coverage includes data on educational attainment, education expectancy, enrolment rates of different age groups, age ranges of universal primary and secondary education, female participation, upper secondary enrolment patterns, entry rates into upper secondary and tertiary education, graduation rates, grade repetition, population and GDP, expenditure on education, teaching staff, class size, teachers' salaries, and expenditure per student. By examining the data from these countries and comparing it to that of OECD countries,  this volume examines the factors which can generate growth in education in one country and constrain it in another.

The countries participating in this study include: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Jamaica, Jordan, Malaysia, Paraguay, Peru, the Philippines, the Russian Federation, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay and Zimbabwe.

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Publication Date :
13 Oct 2005
DOI :
10.1787/wei-2005-en
 
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Indonesia You do not have access to this content

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Author(s):
OECD
Pages :
122–123
DOI :
10.1787/wei-2005-10-en

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Between 1995 and 2002, development in Indonesia was dominated by the Asian economic crisis of 1997 and an ensuing national political crisis. However, growth in real GDP per capita was substantial before the crisis and income per capita rebounded by 2000 and began increasing again. Still, Indonesia has the second-lowest income per person among WEI countries at less than one-half of the group average. Despite the crises, poverty reduction has been considerable with extreme poverty falling from 21.0 to 6.7 per cent between 1990 and 2000. These data imply that the UN Millennium Development...