Tertiary Education for the Knowledge Society
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Tertiary Education for the Knowledge Society

Volume 1 and Volume 2

This book provides a thorough international investigation of tertiary education policy across its many facets – governance, funding, quality assurance, equity, research and innovation, academic career, links to the labour market and internationalisation. It presents an analysis of the trends and developments in tertiary education; a synthesis of research-based evidence on the impact of tertiary-education policies; innovative and successful policies and practices that countries have implemented; and tertiary-education policy options. The report draws on the results of a major OECD review of tertiary education policy – the OECD Thematic Review of Tertiary Education -- conducted over the 2004-08 period in collaboration with 24 countries around the world.

"The new ‘bible’ of Post-secondary education."

-Paul Cappon, President of the Canadian Council on Learning

 "An exceptionally useful and interesting review."

-Tom Boland, Chief Executive, Higher Education Authority of Ireland

 "The reference text for the future debate on tertiary education."

-José Joaquín Brunner, Professor and Director,
Centre for Comparative Education Policies, University of Diego Portales, Chile

 

 

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Publication Date :
16 Sep 2008
DOI :
10.1787/9789264046535-en
 
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Appendix C – Improving the Knowledge Base You do not have access to this content

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Author(s):
OECD
Pages :
377–384
DOI :
10.1787/9789264046535-17-en

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In the country-specific background reports and detailed analyses of external teams, the Review has identified several areas where data or research gaps impair policy diagnosis and informed policy making. These information gaps can be grouped along the broad areas of tertiary education supply and demand, access and participation, human and financial resources, and completion and outcomes. In some cases, it would be sufficient to address these gaps at the system level while information at institutional level would be desirable in other instances.