TALIS

English
ISSN: 
2312-9638 (online)
ISSN: 
2312-962X (print)
DOI: 
10.1787/23129638
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How can countries prepare teachers to face the diverse challenges in today’s schools? The OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) helps answer this question by asking teachers and school leaders about their working conditions and the learning environments at their schools. TALIS aims to provide valid, timely and comparable information to help countries review and define policies for developing a high-quality teaching profession. It is an opportunity for teachers and school leaders to provide input into educational policy analysis and development in key areas. Themes explored include professional development, school leadership, teaching practices, school climate, appraisal and feedback, job satisfaction and teacher profiles.

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TALIS 2013 Results

TALIS 2013 Results

An International Perspective on Teaching and Learning You do not have access to this content

English
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Author(s):
OECD
25 June 2014
Pages:
440
ISBN:
9789264196261 (PDF) ;9789264211339(print)
DOI: 
10.1787/9789264196261-en

Hide / Show Abstract

How can countries prepare teachers to face the diverse challenges in today’s schools?  The OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) helps answer this question by asking teachers and school leaders about their working conditions and the learning environments at their schools. TALIS aims to provide valid, timely and comparable information to help countries review and define policies for developing a high-quality teaching profession. It is an opportunity for teachers and school leaders to provide input into educational policy analysis and development in key areas.  This report presents the results of the second cycle of the TALIS survey conducted in 2013.

Also available in French, Italian
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  • Foreword and Acknowledgements

    The skills that students need to contribute effectively to society are in constant change. Yet, our education systems are not keeping up with the fast pace of the world around us. Most schools look much the same today as they did a generation ago, and teachers themselves are often not developing the practices and skills necessary to meet the diverse needs of today’s learners.

  • Executive Summary

    Our view of teachers is coloured by our own experience as students. This firsthand – and often dated – knowledge is augmented by the portrayal of teachers and their working conditions in the media. Thus, in many countries, the traditional view of teaching is one in which teachers work alone in classrooms, behind closed doors, often with larger numbers of students than they can realistically handle. In some countries, teaching is seen as a job without real career prospects that young people enter if they cannot get into a better one. The fact that pay tends to be lower than that of other college graduates is compensated for by the fact that teachers often enjoy more holiday time and are seen as working fewer hours than their colleagues in other fields.

  • Reader's Guide

    This report presents statistics and analysis derived from the survey responses of teachers of lower secondary education (level 2 of the International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED-97)) and the principals of their schools.

  • Overview of TALIS

    This chapter introduces the Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) and provides information about the participating countries and economies and the teachers and schools surveyed. It describes the objectives of TALIS as well as the main themes covered by the survey and this report, and provides information to explain why these themes were chosen as a policy focus for this study. This chapter also provides an outline of the report to follow.

  • Teachers and their Schools

    This chapter provides background information about the teachers surveyed as part of the OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) and the schools in which they work. The first part of the chapter focuses on demographic characteristics such as the age and gender of teachers, their formal education and their previous work experience. The second section of the chapter provides a profile of the schools in which teachers work, with particular emphasis on school background information, resources, composition of students at the school, the level of autonomy enjoyed at the school level and school climate. In addition, this chapter begins to look at issues of equity in education systems by examining the distribution of teachers across the systems and also provides a basis for analyses conducted in subsequent chapters of this volume.

  • The Importance of School Leadership

    Unlike other chapters of this volume, which take the teachers’ perspective in the analyses, the data in this chapter focus on principals and the schools in which they work. This chapter provides details about the increasingly demanding role of school principals; their responsibilities; the instructional leadership they provide; their demographic characteristics, formal education, prior work experience, and engagement in professional development; and their satisfaction with their work. Findings from the cross-national comparisons are used to draw inferences for policy and practice.

  • Developing and Supporting Teachers

    This chapter focuses on the professional development experiences of teachers. Professional development refers to activities that aim to advance teachers’ skills and knowledge, with the ultimate aim of improving their teaching practice. The chapter looks at what studies say about the importance of professional development and then discusses reports from teachers about the different types of development opportunities they receive (including induction and mentoring programmes). It also examines the range of variables related to teachers and schools that might influence the amount of professional development that a teacher undertakes. The discussion then moves to the development needs that teachers identify and the barriers that prevent teachers from getting the professional development they desire. It concludes with recommendations for policy makers, school leaders and teachers.

  • Improving Teaching Using Appraisal and Feedback

    Teacher appraisal and feedback are important components of teachers’ careers and development. The primary purpose is to provide teachers with valuable input to better understand and improve their teaching practice. However, teacher appraisal and feedback can also be used to identify professional development or career opportunities for teachers. This chapter looks at teachers’ access to both formal appraisal and formal and informal feedback from sources internal and external to their schools. The chapter explores the focus and content of the appraisal and feedback that teachers receive, as well as any consequences that result. Finally, the chapter discusses whether other factors, such as increased school autonomy, have an influence on the nature and occurrence of teacher appraisal and feedback.

  • Examining Teacher Practices and Classroom Environment

    This chapter examines different types of teaching practices, teachers’ beliefs and classroom environments. Specifically, the chapter examines the teaching and professional practices that teachers report using in their work and their beliefs about the nature of teaching and learning. The chapter provides analyses of teaching environments and explores the relationship between teaching practices, teachers’ beliefs, classroom environments and school leadership. Implications for policy and practice are discussed based on the results presented.

  • Teacher Self-Efficacy and Job Satisfaction: Why They Matter

    This chapter focuses on teachers’ feelings of self-efficacy and job satisfaction. Self-efficacy refers to the level of confidence teachers have in their abilities, while job satisfaction is the sense of fulfilment and gratification that teachers get from working. The chapter looks at some of the themes previously examined in this report (professional development, appraisal and feedback, school leadership, teacher characteristics) and investigates whether they influence teachers’ feelings of self-efficacy and job satisfaction. The discussion then considers teacher and school characteristics that might serve to lessen the effects of potentially challenging classroom circumstances for teachers. It concludes with recommendations for policy makers, school leaders and teachers.

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  • Expand / Collapse Hide / Show all Abstracts Annexes

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    • Technical notes on sampling procedures and response rates for TALIS 2013

      The objective of the Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) in 2013 was to obtain, in each participating country, a representative sample of teachers for each ISCED level in which the country participated. Moreover, a representative sample of teachers teaching students of the appropriate age in schools selected for Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) in 2012 was required for each country that opted to participate in the TALIS-PISA link. TALIS 2013 identified policy issues that encompass the classroom, teachers, schools and school management, so the coverage of TALIS 2013 extends to all teachers of each concerned ISCED level and to the principals of the schools where they teach. The international sampling plan prepared for TALIS 2013 used a stratified two-stage probability sampling design. This means that teachers (second stage units, or secondary sampling units) were to be randomly selected from the list of in-scope teachers in each of the randomly selected schools (first stage units, or primary sampling units). A more detailed description of the survey design and its implementation can be found in the TALIS Technical Report (2014).

    • Technical notes on indices and analysis used in TALIS 2013

      This annex provides information on how the indices (or scales) and other measures derived from the TALIS 2013 teacher and principal questionnaires were constructed. It also provides technical details of some of the more advanced statistical analyses presented throughout the report. Additional technical details on these matters can be found in the TALIS 2013 Technical Report.

    • TALIS 2013 Tables of results
    • List of contributors

      TALIS is a collaborative effort, bringing together expertise from participating countries that share an interest in developing a survey programme to inform their policies about teachers, teaching and learning. This report is the product of collaboration and co-operation among the member countries of the OECD and the partner countries participating in the second round of TALIS. Engagement with bodies representing teachers and regular briefings and exchanges with the Trade Union Advisory Council at the OECD have been very important in the development and implementation of TALIS. In particular, the co-operation of the teachers and principals in the participating schools has been crucial in ensuring the success of TALIS.

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