Higher Education Management and Policy

Discontinued
Frequency
3 times a year
ISSN: 
1726-9822 (online)
ISSN: 
1682-3451 (print)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/17269822
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Previously published as Higher Education Management, Higher Education Management and Policy (HEMP) is published three times each year and is edited by the OECD’s Programme on Institutional Management in Higher Education. It covers the field through articles and reports on such issues as quality assurance, human resources, funding, and internationalisation. It also is a source of information on activities and events organised by OECD’s IMHE Programme.

Also available in French
Article
 

Policies and Networks in the Construction of the European Higher Education Area You do not have access to this content

English
 
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/8906011ec007.pdf
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Author(s):
Kostas A. Lavdas, Nikos E. Papadakis, Marrianna Gidarakou
04 July 2007
Pages:
12
Bibliographic information
No.:
7,
Volume:
18,
Issue:
1
Pages:
121–131
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/hemp-v18-art7-en

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Within the European Union, issues of comparability and compatibility regarding higher education policy are defined by new challenges, while interest politics increasingly affect the actions and the discursive practices that constitute both the new European Higher Education Policy Area and its relation to other crucial public policies (economic, social and labour policies). This article attempts a policy-impact analysis focusing on a) issues of interest politics, key-actors, interaction among supranational policy agendas and policy networks, b) issues of decentralisation, internationalisation and deregulation in higher education policy, with particular reference to the Bologna Follow-Up process, and c) educational reform processes organised as policy reform rituals. The main hypothesis of the study is that HEIs are perceived as key partners/providers and this perception transforms the role of the HEIs within the context of strategic partnership interests (at national, regional and institutional levels).
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