PISA

English
ISSN: 
1996-3777 (online)
ISSN: 
1990-8539 (print)
DOI: 
10.1787/19963777
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A series of reports on the OECD’s Programme for International Student Assessment’s (PISA) periodic testing program on student performance. The reports generally compare student (15 year olds) academic performance across countries, or discuss the methodology used to gather the data.

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PISA 2015 Results (Volume III)

PISA 2015 Results (Volume III)

Students' Well-Being You or your institution have access to this content

English
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Author(s):
OECD
19 Apr 2017
Pages:
528
ISBN:
9789264273856 (PDF) ;9789264273818(print)
DOI: 
10.1787/9789264273856-en

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The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) examines not just what students know in science, reading and mathematics, but what they can do with what they know. Results from PISA show educators and policy makers the quality and equity of learning outcomes achieved elsewhere, and allow them to learn from the policies and practices applied in other countries. PISA 2015 Results (Volume III): Students’ Well-Being, is one of five volumes that present the results of the PISA 2015 survey, the sixth round of the triennial assessment. It explores a comprehensive set of well-being indicators for adolescents that covers both negative outcomes (e.g. anxiety, low performance) and the positive impulses that promote healthy development (e.g. interest, engagement, motivation to achieve).

Children spend a considerable amount of time in the classroom: following lessons, socialising with classmates, and interacting with teachers and other staff members. What happens in school – as well as at home – is therefore key to understanding whether students enjoy good physical and mental health, how happy and satisfied they are with different aspects of their life, how connected to others they feel, and the aspirations they have for their future.

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  • Foreword

    Over the past decade, the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment, PISA, has become the world’s premier yardstick for evaluating the quality, equity and efficiency of school systems. But the evidence base that PISA has produced goes well beyond statistical benchmarking. By identifying the characteristics of high-performing education systems, PISA allows governments and educators to identify effective policies that they can then adapt to their local contexts.

  • Editorial

    Schools are not just places where students acquire academic skills; they also help students become more resilient in the face of adversity, feel more connected with the people around them, and aim higher in their aspirations for their future. Not least, schools are the first place where children experience society in all its facets, and those experiences can have a profound influence on students’ attitudes and behaviour in life.

  • Executive summary

    Schools are not only places where students acquire academic skills; they are also where children develop many of the social and emotional skills that they need to thrive. Schools that nurture children’s development in these ways help students attain a sense of control over – and satisfaction with – their life. They can help students become more resilient in the face of adversity, feel more connected with the people around them, and aim higher in their aspirations for their future. In other words, what happens in school is crucial for well-being. Students’ well-being, as defined in this report, refers to the psychological, cognitive, social and physical qualities that students need to live a happy and fulfilling life.

  • What is pisa?

    “What is important for citizens to know and be able to do?” In response to that question and to the need for internationally comparable evidence on student performance, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) launched the triennial survey of 15-year-old students around the world known as the Programme for International Students Assessment, or PISA. PISA assesses the extent to which 15-year-old students, near the end of their compulsory education, have acquired key knowledge and skills that are essential for full participation in modern societies. The assessment focuses on the core school subjects of science, reading and mathematics. Students’ proficiency in an innovative domain is also assessed (in 2015, this domain is collaborative problem solving). The assessment does not just ascertain whether students can reproduce knowledge; it also examines how well students can extrapolate from what they have learned and can apply that knowledge in unfamiliar settings, both in and outside of school. This approach reflects the fact that modern economies reward individuals not for what they know, but for what they can do with what they know.

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  • Expand / Collapse Hide / Show all Abstracts Overview and the research framework

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    • Overview: Students' Well-Being

      Children spend a considerable amount of time in the classroom: following lessons, socialising with classmates, and interacting with teachers and other staff members. What happens in school is therefore key to understanding whether students enjoy good physical and mental health, how happy and satisfied they are with different aspects of their life, how connected to others they feel, and the aspirations they have for their future.

    • Students' well-being: What it is and how it can be measured

      With student well-being increasingly incorporated into education policy, interest is growing in comparing how well different education systems promote students’ development and quality of life. This chapter defines students’ well-being and examines how it is measured by PISA. The chapter also discusses the aims of this volume as part of the PISA 2015 Results.

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  • Expand / Collapse Hide / Show all Abstracts Performance at school and life satisfaction

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    • Students' satisfaction with their life

      This chapter discusses how students’ overall satisfaction with their life varies across countries, among subgroups of students within a country, and by school characteristics. The chapter also examines the associations between students’ satisfaction with life, performance at school and the time students invest in studying.

    • Schoolwork-related anxiety

      For many students, assignments and tests present less a motivation to learn useful skills than a source of deep anxiety. This chapter examines the prevalence of schoolwork-related anxiety among students and how that anxiety can affect not only performance but students’ overall well-being. The chapter concludes with a discussion of how teachers and parents can help reduce students’ anxiety at school.

    • Students' motivation to achieve

      Motivation is frequently what makes the difference between success and failure, in school as in life. This chapter examines how students’ achievement motivation differs among countries and how it is related to students’ gender, socio-economic status and immigrant background. It also discusses how the motivation to achieve can influence student performance and have an impact on students’ satisfaction with their life.

    • Students' expectations of further education

      Which 15-year-old students are more likely to continue into higher education? This chapter examines some of the factors that shape that decision, and how the expectation of completing university can, in turn, influence students’ performance in school and have an impact on their well-being, in general. The chapter also discusses how parents’ attitudes can affect students’ expectations of further education and how certain education policies can promote – or undermine – those expectations.

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  • Expand / Collapse Hide / Show all Abstracts Students’ social life at school

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    • Students' sense of belonging at school and their relations with teachers

      When students feel that they are a part of a school community, they are more likely to perform better academically and are more motivated to learn. This chapter examines differences between countries in the strength of students’ sense of belonging at school, and how a sense of belonging is associated with students’ gender, socio-economic status and immigrant background. The chapter also explores how the climate at school and students’ relations with their teachers can affect students’ feelings of being a valued member of the school community.

    • Bullying

      Bullying at school can have long-lasting consequences for students’ (both victims and bullies) psychological well-being. This chapter defines bullying according to PISA and explains how PISA measures the incidence of bullying. It discusses the prevalence of bullying around the world and which students might be more likely to be victims of bullying. The chapter examines the relationship between bullying and student performance, and between bullying and other dimensions of students’ well-being. The chapter concludes with a discussion on how schools, teachers and parents can help reduce the incidence of bullying.

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  • Expand / Collapse Hide / Show all Abstracts Parents and the home environment

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    • Parental involvement, student performance and satisfaction with life

      This chapter examines how parents’ interest in their child’s life, certain parent-child activities, and parents’ participation in school-related activities are associated with students’ performance and students’ satisfaction with their own life. The chapter also discusses the factors that parents cite as obstacles to participation in their child’s school activities.

    • Wealth, social status and inequalities in well-being

      This chapter examines how parents’ occupation, income and wealth are related to students’ performance, satisfaction with life, and their expectations of further education and a career later on. It also shows how the socio-economic composition of schools is related to disadvantaged students’ evaluations of the quality of their life and their expectations for their future.

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  • Expand / Collapse Hide / Show all Abstracts Students’ use of their time outside of school

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    • Students' physical activities and eating habits

      Regular exercise and healthy eating are important for people of all ages, but perhaps particularly so for teenagers, as adolescence is the period when many lifelong habits are formed. This chapter examines the extent of students’ physical activities in and outside of school, and how regular physical activity (or the lack of it) is related to student performance and well-being. The chapter also describes students’ eating habits, including eating disorders among adolescents, and the benefits of eating meals with parents.

    • Students' paid and unpaid work

      For the first time, PISA 2015 asked students to report whether they worked for pay and/or worked in the home (or cared for family members) before or after school during the most recent day that they attended school. This chapter reveals the extent to which 15-year-old students around the world work for pay, or work unpaid in the household, before or after school. The chapter examines which students are more likely to work for pay and which are more likely to do household work without pay. It also discusses the relationship between paid and unpaid work, and students’ performance in and attitudes towards school.

    • Students' use of ICT outside of school

      This chapter describes how students spend their time on line outside of school. It examines students’ access to the Internet, how they use the web, and the relationship between online activities – and the number of hours spent on line – and students’ well-being. The chapter also discusses the digital divides related to socio-economic status that persist both between and within countries.

    • What PISA 2015 results on students' well-being imply for policy

      Promoting well-being at school has become an important priority for education policy. Yet researchers, educators and parents still do not agree about the policies and practices that are more effective in fostering the healthy psychological, social, cognitive and physical development of students. This chapter discusses several policy initiatives, and frontline interventions by teachers and parents, that could help narrow disparities in well-being among students.

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