PISA

English
ISSN: 
1996-3777 (online)
ISSN: 
1990-8539 (print)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/19963777
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A series of reports on the OECD’s Programme for International Student Assessment’s (PISA) periodic testing program on student performance. The reports generally compare student (15 year olds) academic performance across countries, or discuss the methodology used to gather the data.

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PISA 2015 Assessment and Analytical Framework

PISA 2015 Assessment and Analytical Framework

Science, Reading, Mathematic and Financial Literacy You or your institution have access to this content

English
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Author(s):
OECD
19 Apr 2016
Pages:
200
ISBN:
9789264255425 (PDF) ;9789264255418(print)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264255425-en

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“What is important for citizens to know and be able to do?” The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) seeks to answer that question through the most comprehensive and rigorous international assessment of student knowledge and skills. The PISA 2015 Assessment and Analytical Framework presents the conceptual foundations of the sixth cycle of the triennial assessment. Similar to the previous cycles, the 2015 assessment covers science, reading and mathematics, with the major focus on scientific literacy this cycle. Financial literacy is also evaluated as an optional assessment, as it was in 2012.A questionnaire about students’ background is distributed to all participating students. Students may also choose to complete additional questionnaires: one about their future studies and career, a second about their familiarity with information and communication technologies. School principals complete a questionnaire about the learning environment in their schools, and parents of students who sit the PISA test can choose to complete a questionnaire about the home environment. Seventy-one countries and economies, including all 34 OECD countries, participated in the PISA 2015 assessment.

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  • Foreword

    The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), created in 1997, represents a commitment by the governments of OECD countries to monitor the outcomes of education systems, in terms of student achievement, within a common, internationally agreed framework. PISA is a collaborative effort, bringing together scientific expertise from the participating countries/economies and steered jointly by their governments on the basis of shared policy interests. Experts from participating countries also serve on working groups that are charged with linking the PISA policy objectives with the best available substantive and technical expertise in the field of internationally comparable assessments. Through involvement in these expert groups, countries ensure that the PISA assessment instruments are internationally valid and take into account the cultural and curricular context of the PISA-participating countries and economies.

  • What is PISA?

    “What is important for citizens to know and be able to do?” In response to that question and to the need for crossnationally comparable evidence on student performance, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) launched the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) in 1997. PISA assesses the extent to which 15-year-old students, near the end of their compulsory education, have acquired key knowledge and skills that are essential for full participation in modern societies.

  • PISA 2015 Science Framework

    Science is the main subject of assessment in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) in 2015. This chapter defines “scientific literacy” as assessed in PISA. It describes the types of contexts, knowledge, competencies and attitudes towards science that are reflected in the assessment’s science problems and provides several sample items. The chapter also discusses how student performance in science is measured and reported.

  • PISA 2015 Reading Framework

    This chapter defines “reading literacy” as assessed in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) in 2015 and the competencies required for reading literacy. It describes the cognitive processes (aspects) involved in reading that are assessed, the types of texts and response formats used in the assessment, and how student performance in reading is measured and reported.

  • PISA 2015 Mathematics Framework

    This chapter defines “mathematical literacy” as assessed in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) in 2015 and the competencies required for mathematical literacy. It explains the processes, content knowledge and contexts reflected in the assessment’s mathematics problems, and how student performance in mathematics is measured and reported.

  • PISA 2015 Financial Literacy Framework

    This chapter describes the rationale behind measuring 15-year-olds’ financial literacy in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and defines the term. It explains the content, processes and contexts that are reflected in the financial literacy problems used in the assessment, and describes how student proficiency in financial literacy is measured and reported.

  • PISA 2015 Context Questionnaires Framework

    This chapter describes the core content of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2015 and PISA’s interest in measuring student’s engagement at school, dispositions towards school and their self-beliefs, and in gathering information about students’ backgrounds and the learning environment at school. The chapter discusses the content and aims of the Student Questionnaire, the School Questionnaire (completed by school principals), the optional Parent Questionnaire (completed by parents of students who sat the PISA test), the optional Educational Career Questionnaire (completed by students, concerning their educational and career aspirations), the optional ICT Familiarity Questionnaire (completed by students, concerning their attitudes towards and experience with computers) and the optional Teacher Questionnaire (completed by teachers, and introduced in PISA 2015).

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    • PISA 2015 Background questionnaires

      Annex A presents the background questionnaires used in the PISA 2015. These are the school questionnaire distributed to school principals; the student questionnaire distributed to all participating students; two optional questionnaires for students: the educational career questionnaire and the ICT familiarity questionnaire; an optional questionnaire for parents; an optional questionnaire for teachers.

    • PISA 2015 Expert groups

      Annex B lists the members of the expert groups who were involved in developing the PISA 2015 framework for the major domain (science) and the questionnaires. The lists of the experts involved in developing the PISA 2009 framework for reading and the 2012 framework for mathematics and financial literacy can be found in the OECD publications PISA 2009 Assessment Framework – Key competencies in Reading, Mathematics and Science (2009) and PISA 2012 Frameworks – Mathematics, Problem Solving and Financial Literacy (2013), respectively.

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