Pathways to Success
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Pathways to Success

How Knowledge and Skills at Age 15 Shape Future Lives in Canada

Presents the findings of Canada's Youth in Transition Survey, which complements OECD's PISA survey and offers significant new policy insights in understanding students’ choices at different ages and the impact of these decisions on consequent education and labour market outcomes. YITS is a longitudinal study that tracks 30 000 Canadian students who took part in the PISA 2000 assessment and, with interviews every two years, follows their progress from secondary school into higher education and the labour market.
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Competent Pathways to Work: PISA Scores and Labour Market Returns You do not have access to this content

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Author(s):
OECD

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An important societal and individual outcome of a country’s education system is the level of success experienced by youth as they enter the labour market. In 2006, the point at which the latest data from YITS are available for this report, Canadian youth were 21 years old and many were only beginning the journey into the world of work. Hence, this chapter represents an initial analysis of the labour market outcomes of Canadian youth. It examines the associations between achievement in PISA 2000 and a number of background characteristics with respect to two key labour market outcomes: earnings and the likelihood of unemployment. By age 21, there is some evidence about the relationship between skills, as measured by PISA and labour market outcomes, but it is most likely still too early to tell whether any potential impact could strengthen the youths’ careers. These results represent an important first look at these outcomes that can be built on as the results of YITS 2008 and 2010 become available.
 
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