OECD Reviews of Evaluation and Assessment in Education

ISSN :
2223-0955 (online)
ISSN :
2223-0947 (print)
DOI :
10.1787/22230955
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How can student assessment, teacher appraisal, school evaluation and system evaluation bring about real gains in performance across a country’s school system? The country reports in this series provide, from an international perspective, an independent analysis of major issues facing the evaluation and assessment framework, current policy initiatives, and possible future approaches. This series forms part of the OECD Review on Evaluation and Assessment Frameworks for Improving School Outcomes.

 
OECD Reviews of Evaluation and Assessment in Education: School Evaluation in the Flemish Community of Belgium 2011

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Author(s):
Claire Shewbridge, Marian Hulshof, Deborah Nusche, Louise Stoll
Publication Date :
07 Dec 2011
Pages :
143
ISBN :
9789264116726 (PDF) ; 9789264168046 (print)
DOI :
10.1787/9789264116726-en

Hide / Show Abstract

How can student assessment, teacher appraisal, school evaluation and system evaluation bring about real gains in performance across a country’s school system? The country reports in this series provide, from an international perspective, an independent analysis of major issues facing the evaluation and assessment framework, current policy initiatives, and possible future approaches. This series forms part of the OECD Review on Evaluation and Assessment Frameworks for Improving School Outcomes.

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  • Click to Access:  Foreword
    This report for the Flemish Community of Belgium forms part of the OECD Review on Evaluation and Assessment Frameworks for Improving School Outcomes (see Annex A for further details). The purpose of the Review is to explore how systems of evaluation and assessment can be used to improve the quality, equity and efficiency of school education. The Review looks at the various components of assessment and evaluation frameworks that countries use with the objective of improving student outcomes. These include student assessment, teacher appraisal, school evaluation and system evaluation.
  • Click to Access:  Acronyms and abbreviations
  • Click to Access:  Executive summary
    Flemish schools enjoy a high degree of autonomy and are free to develop their own educational policies, including curriculum, assessment, certification and any selfevaluation activities. However, in order to be able to award official qualifications or to receive funding, schools must meet certain conditions set by the Flemish authorities, including: following a core curriculum (attainment targets or developmental objectives according to the stage or type of education); and allowing the Flemish authorities to assure their quality (this is done via the Inspectorate). However, all schools belong to an educational network and may choose to use a curriculum and/or tests developed by the different umbrella organisations within these networks.
  • Click to Access:  Schooling in the Flemish Community of Belgium
    The chapter presents the main features of the Flemish school system, including its structure, school funding and rights to award official qualifications and the major educational networks available to schools. It also examines evidence on the quality and equity of Flemish schools and considers major trends and policy developments that influence school evaluation.
  • Click to Access:  Governing school evaluation
    This chapter gives an overview of the major features of school evaluation governance in the Flemish Community of Belgium, including: the division of responsibilities for school evaluation; major information sources used for school evaluation; the design, role and extent of interaction between internal and external school evaluation; and structures to promote consultation and collaboration within and among schools. It then analyses the strengths and challenges to the current governance approach and recommends some areas for further policy development.
  • Click to Access:  School self-evaluation
    This chapter gives an overview of the major features of school self-evaluation in the Flemish Community of Belgium, including: different procedures currently used, such as tools, measures and processes for self-evaluation; how self-evaluation results are used for improvement, how they are shared within and among schools and the extent to which they are used during the school inspection process; and the competencies and capacity for school self-evaluation, considering both teacher and school leader qualification requirements and rights to professional development. It then analyses the current strengths and challenges to school self-evaluation in the Flemish Community of Belgium and recommends some areas for further policy development.
  • Click to Access:  School inspections
    This chapter gives an overview of the major features of school inspections or external school evaluations in the Flemish Community of Belgium, including: different procedures currently used, such as the new differentiated inspection approach, the inspection framework and categories of official recommendations the Inspectorate can make; how inspection results are used by schools, the public and for research; and the competencies and capacity for school inspections, considering how the Inspectorate is organised, recruitment of inspectors and their professional development. It then analyses the current strengths and challenges to school inspections in the Flemish Community of Belgium and recommends some areas for further policy development.
  • Click to Access:  Conclusions and recommendations
    Education is compulsory from the ages of 6 to 18 in the Flemish Community of Belgium and most young people complete this in primary and secondary schools. Schooling is organised in four main stages, with the first streaming of children into different types of education at the end of primary school. The principle of Freedom of education means that schools enjoy a high degree of autonomy. Schools develop their own educational policies, including pedagogical plans, teaching methods, curriculum and timetables, and appoint their own staff. At the same time, parents are free to choose a school for their child(ren) which lays the foundation for potentially strong competition among schools. All student assessment and related certification at key stages of schooling is designed and conducted at the school level, but schools may seek external support.
  • Click to Access:  Annexes
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