OECD Education Working Papers

ISSN :
1993-9019 (online)
DOI :
10.1787/19939019
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This series is designed to make available to a wider readership selected studies drawing on the work of the OECD Directorate for Education. Authorship is usually collective, but principal writers are named. The papers are generally available only in their original language (English or French) with a short summary available in the other.
 

Learning from International Experiences with Interactive Whiteboards

The Role of Professional Development in Integrating the Technology You or your institution have access to this content

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Author(s):
Sara Hennessy1, Laura London1
Author Affiliations
  • 1: University of Cambridge, United Kingdom

Publication Date
27 Mar 2013
Bibliographic information
No.:
89
Pages
33
DOI
10.1787/5k49chbsnmls-en

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This paper describes teacher strategies and experiences with interactive whiteboards (IWBs) and draws on the published research in this area to understand how a systemic approach to technology-based innovations in schools can contribute to quality education for all. It explores ways to support the cultural shift in teacher and learner roles that helps to integrate the technology effectively into classroom teaching. It begins by considering how the features of IWB technology might potentially be exploited in the primary or secondary school classroom to support subject teaching and learning. International experiences of implementing IWB programs are then described, mostly from the United Kingdom where integration efforts are the most prominent, and implications for future intervention efforts are examined. The review concludes by defining the organisational conditions for enhancing teacher commitment and thus the likelihood for successful change. In particular, the role of teacher professional development is foregrounded and characteristics of effective programmes are outlined. Some comments about the relative costs and benefits, and recommendations for policymakers, are made.