Learning for Jobs
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Learning for Jobs

Learning for Jobs is an OECD study of vocational education and training designed to help countries make their Vocational Education and Training (VET) Systems  more responsive to labour market needs. It expands the evidence base, identifies a set of policy options and develops tools to appraise VET policy initiatives.
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Tools to support the system You do not have access to this content

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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/9110041ec008.pdf
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Author(s):
OECD

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VET systems do not exist in isolation; their effectiveness depends on their links to the labour market. This implies two types of supporting arrangements. First we need tools to engage the key stakeholders in VET – in particular so that employers can explain the skills that they need, and negotiate the provision of these skills with other stakeholders, and to ensure that the content of VET – what is taught in VET schools and in the workplace and how exams are designed – is relevant to the labour market. Second we need information tools so that the value of vocational programmes of study can be identified, recognised and analysed. These information tools include qualification frameworks, systems of assessment, and data and research. Better information might be provided either through leaver surveys, or through the development of longitudinal datasets, linking VET administrative records to later experience including employment experience. Better data need to be linked to the capacity to interpret and use those data in national institutions for VET research.
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