Innovating Education and Educating for Innovation
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Innovating Education and Educating for Innovation

The Power of Digital Technologies and Skills

OECD’s Innovation Strategy calls upon all sectors in the economy and society to innovate in order to foster productivity, growth and well-being. Education systems are critically important for innovation through the development of skills that nurture new ideas and technologies. However, whereas digital technologies are profoundly changing the way we work, communicate and enjoy ourselves, the world of education and learning is not yet going through the same technology-driven innovation process as other sectors.

This report served as the background report to the second Global Education Industry Summit which was held on 26-27 September 2016. It discusses the available evidence on innovation in education, the impact of digital technologies on teaching and learning, the role of digital skills and the role of educational industries in the process of innovation. The report argues for smarter policies, involving all stakeholders, for innovation in education.

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OECD

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Education policies need to reflect the fact that computers and the Internet are increasingly ubiquitous in everyday lives. This chapter considers the potential and actual impact of information and communications technology (ICT) on teaching and learning. It finds that between 2003 and 2012, students across the world have gained greater access to computers at school, although the intensity and variety of use varies across countries. It examines the factors which encourage teachers to make more use of ICT in the classroom and what holds them back, and looks at teachers’ ICT problem-solving skills in relation to their peers outside education. Finally, it considers whether investment in technology, or students’ use of computers and the Internet, are related to improved educational outcomes.

 
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