Higher Education Management and Policy

Institutional Management in Higher Education

Discontinued
Frequency
3 times a year
ISSN: 
1726-9822 (online)
ISSN: 
1682-3451 (print)
DOI: 
10.1787/17269822
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Previously published as Higher Education Management, Higher Education Management and Policy (HEMP) is published three times each year and is edited by the OECD’s Programme on Institutional Management in Higher Education. It covers the field through articles and reports on such issues as quality assurance, human resources, funding, and internationalisation. It also is a source of information on activities and events organised by OECD’s IMHE Programme.

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Volume 22, Issue 1 You do not have access to this content

31 Mar 2010
DOI: 
10.1787/hemp-v22-1-en

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  31 Mar 2010
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/8910011ec005.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/education/quality-assurance-in-higher-education-as-a-political-process_hemp-22-5kmlh5gs3zr0
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Quality assurance in higher education as a political process
Michael L. Skolnik
The procedures commonly employed for quality assurance in higher education are designed as if the endeavour were a technical process, whereas it may be more useful to view it as a political process. For example, quality assurance requires making choices among competing conceptions of quality, and in so doing privileges some interests over others. Moreover, some stakeholders tend to be given a greater voice than others in the design and implementation of quality assurance. The author concludes that rather than denying the political nature of quality assurance, it would be better to accept Morley’s claim that quality assurance is "a socially constructed domain of power", and design procedures for it in a way that is appropriate for a political process. It is suggested that employing the "responsive model" of evaluation could make quality assurance more effective in improving educational quality. In the responsive model, evaluation is deemed to be a collaborative process that starts with the claims, concerns and issues put forth by all stakeholders.
  31 Mar 2010
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/8910011ec006.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/education/system-accreditation_hemp-22-5kml8rv4vgjg
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System accreditation
Tanja Grendel, Christoph Rosenbusch
"System accreditation" is a new approach developed for German universities to conduct the mandatory accreditation of all their study programmes. A pilot project at Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz is playing an important role in paving the way for this alternative to prevailing programme accreditation. This article describes how system accreditation, an innovative approach towards organisational adaption to national regulations, was conceived and how it functions. Based on the experience of Johannes Gutenberg University, the article explores the potential of system accreditation to improve quality assurance and the development of study programmes. System accreditation faces three global challenges: that of creating an integrated approach, establishing a solid evidence base and fostering the effectiveness of evaluation efforts.
  31 Mar 2010
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/8910011ec007.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/education/knowledge-as-a-common-good_hemp-v22-art8-en
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Knowledge as a common good
Lex M. Bouter
Universities are, to a large extent, publicly funded. It is reasonable to expect that society should benefit as a result. This means that scientific research should at least have a potential societal impact. Universities and individual researchers should therefore give serious thought to the societal relevance of their research activities and report on them widely. Core questions they should be asking are: "Do we do the right things?" and "Do we do them right?". This implies that as well as indicators of scientific quality, attention should be given to indicators of societal relevance. These two considerations are examined in the context of current evaluation practices of academic research. Twelve indicators of societal relevance are proposed, focusing on both their socio-cultural and economic value. The examples given mainly concern the health and life sciences. This paper concludes with a discussion of the key challenges in evaluating the societal relevance of scientific research.
  31 Mar 2010
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/8910011ec001.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/education/the-state-of-learning-outcomes-assessment-in-the-united-states_hemp-22-5ks5dlhqbfr1
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The state of learning outcomes assessment in the United States
George D. Kuh, Peter T. Ewell
Worldwide, economic and other factors are pressing institutions of higher education to assess student learning to insure that graduates acquire the skills and competencies demanded in the 21st century. This paper summarises the status of undergraduate student learning outcomes assessment at accredited colleges and universities in the United States. Three-quarters of institutions have established learning outcomes for all their students, a necessary first step in the assessment cycle. Most schools are using a combination of institution-level and programme-level assessments. Quality assurance requirements in the form of regional and specialised accreditation, along with an institutional commitment to improve, are the primary drivers of assessment. While there is considerable assessment activity going on, it does not appear that many institutions are using the results effectively to inform curricular modifications or otherwise to enhance teaching and learning. The paper closes with recommendations for various groups that can advance the assessment and institutional improvement agenda.
  31 Mar 2010
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/8910011ec003.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/education/defining-and-monitoring-academic-standards-in-australian-higher-education_hemp-v22-art2-en
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Defining and monitoring academic standards in Australian higher education
Hamish Coates
This paper outlines the need for adopting a more scientific approach to specifying and assessing academic standards in higher education. Drawing together insights from large-scale studies in Australia, it advances a definition of academic standards, explores potential indicators of academic quality and looks at approaches for setting standards. As learner outcomes need to be placed at the forefront of work on academic standards, this paper concludes by exploring the implications of this position for student assessment and institutional change.
  31 Mar 2010
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/8910011ec002.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/education/women-in-science_hemp-v22-art3-en
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Women in science
Sharon Bell
This paper outlines the need for adopting a more scientific approach to specifying and assessing academic standards in higher education. Drawing together insights from large-scale studies in Australia, it advances a definition of academic standards, explores potential indicators of academic quality and looks at approaches for setting standards. As learner outcomes need to be placed at the forefront of work on academic standards, this paper concludes by exploring the implications of this position for student assessment and institutional change.
  31 Mar 2010
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/8910011ec004.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/education/the-intended-and-unintended-effects-of-the-bologna-reforms_hemp-v22-art6-en
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The intended and unintended effects of the Bologna reforms
Sybille Reichert
Bologna reform eulogies and protests tend to focus on the benefits and shortcomings of the new two-tier curricula, their implementation and orientation. In this article, an assessment of the Bologna reforms is made in terms of their larger and less widely discussed systemic and institutional effects - which go far beyond the original reformers’ intentions. Apart from the introduction of new degree structures, the two Bologna reform dimensions which have been most readily adopted and dynamically implemented are the overhaul of Europe’s quality assurance system and the recent reforms of doctoral education. In contrast, the visionary goals of using learning outcomes and competencies as the structuring principle of all curricula in order to ensure greater transparency and reliability, and of promoting student-centred learning, have only been adopted by few countries and institutions. However, the Bologna reforms have also had a range of unintended effects on systems and institutions that often go unnoticed when discussing their impact on European higher education. These include redefining the relationship between institutional profiles, strengthening central institutional leadership and mobilising horizontal communication within institutions.

Sybille Reichert, Reichert Consulting: Policy and Strategy Development in Higher Education, Switzerland

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