OECD Education Working Papers

ISSN: 
1993-9019 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/19939019
Hide / Show Abstract
This series is designed to make available to a wider readership selected studies drawing on the work of the OECD Directorate for Education. Authorship is usually collective, but principal writers are named. The papers are generally available only in their original language (English or French) with a short summary available in the other.
 

"Graduate Jobs" in OECD countries

Analysis Using A New Indicator Based on High Skills Use You or your institution have access to this content

English
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/5jlphd30vdr0-en.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/education/graduate-jobs-in-oecd-countries_5jlphd30vdr0-en
  • READ
Author(s):
Golo Henseke1, Francis Green2
Author Affiliations
  • 1: Centre for Learning and Life Chances in Knowledge Economies and Societies, United Kingdom

  • 2: UCL Institute of Education, United Kingdom

26 Oct 2016
Bibliographic information
No.:
144
Pages:
41
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/5jlphd30vdr0-en

Hide / Show Abstract

A recurring issue for education policy-makers is the labour market effect of the long-term global mass expansion of higher education, particularly on what is a “graduate job”. The traditional assumption is that graduate jobs are virtually coterminous with professional and managerial occupations. A new indicator of graduate jobs, termed ISCO(HE)2008, is derived using task-based data drawn from the The Survey of Adult Skills, a product of the OECD Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). The new classification shows that several jobs in ISCO major group 3 “Technicians and Associate Professionals” are also classed as graduate jobs in many countries. Altogether, 27.6% of jobs are classified as graduate jobs in the 15 OECD country-regions for which we have data. Considerable variation in the proportion of graduate jobs is found across industries and countries and in the short period from 2011 to 2013, the proportion of graduate jobs has become more diverse across countries.
 
Visit the OECD web site