International Summit on the Teaching Profession

English
ISSN: 
2312-7090 (online)
ISSN: 
2312-7082 (print)
DOI: 
10.1787/23127090
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The International Summit on the Teaching Profession brings together education ministers, union leaders and other teacher leaders from high-performing and rapidly improving education systems to review how best to improve the quality of teachers, teaching and learning. Each year, Summit organisers produce a report on the state of the profession that is used as a springboard for discussions. This series is a collection of those reports.

 
Equity, Excellence and Inclusiveness in Education

Equity, Excellence and Inclusiveness in Education

Policy Lessons from Around the World You or your institution have access to this content

English
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/9114031e.pdf
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Author(s):
Andreas Schleicher
04 July 2014
Pages:
112
ISBN:
9789264214033 (PDF) ;9789264211377(print)
DOI: 
10.1787/9789264214033-en

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Excellence in education without equity risks leading to large economic and social disparities; equity in education at the expense of quality is a meaningless aspiration. The most advanced education systems now set ambitious goals for all students, focusing on both excellence and equity. They also equip their teachers with the pedagogic skills that have been proven effective and with enough autonomy so that teachers can use their own creativity in determining the content and instruction they provide to their individual students.

The fourth International Summit on the Teaching Profession brought together education ministers, union leaders and other teacher leaders from high-performing and rapidly improving education systems, as measured by PISA (the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment ). Their aim was to discuss equity, excellence and inclusiveness in education by exploring three questions:

• How are high-quality teachers developed, and how do schools with the greatest need attract and retain them?

• How can equity be ensured in increasingly devolved education systems? and

• What kinds of learning environments address the needs of all students?

To underpin the discussions, this publication identifies some of the steps policy makers can take to build school systems that are both equitable and excellent. The analysis is complemented with examples that illustrate proven or promising practices in specific countries.

 

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  • Foreword and Acknowledgements

    Horace Mann, the 19th century American educator, famously referred to education as "a great equaliser". At a time when the magnitude of income inequality is threatening to tear the social fabric of many OECD countries, it is well worth reviewing our education systems to see whether and how well they are working to provide all students – not just those whose parents can afford it – a quality education.

  • Preface
  • Executive summary
  • Charting a way towards equity and excellence

    This chapter explains the raison d’être of the International Summit on the Teaching Profession and defines the three key themes of the 2014 Summit: excellence, equity and inclusiveness in education. It also makes the case for investing in equity in education.

  • Developing high-quality teachers for the schools with the greatest need

    This chapter focuses on the key resource in education: teachers. Based on PISA 2012 results, it discusses how the quality of financial and teaching resources is associated with student performance – particularly in disadvantaged schools. The chapter examines how some countries manage to recruit the best candidates to become teachers, how these teachers are trained to provide quality education in difficult circumstances, and how some countries attract and retain high-quality teachers in disadvantaged schools.

  • Achieving equity in increasingly devolved education systems

    This chapter focuses on equity in the context of more devolved education systems. Based on PISA 2012 results, it shows the association between school autonomy over curricula and assessments and students’ mathematics performance, the relationship between performance and accountability arrangements, and what parents look for in choosing a school for their child. The chapter discusses the importance of avoiding socio-economic segregation among schools, of informing all parents of the choices available to them, and of investing in early childhood education.

  • Creating learning environments that address the needs of all children

    Using results from PISA 2012, this chapter shows how certain practices that select and sort students, like tracking and grade repetition, are often associated with students’ socio-economic status and with their performance in mathematics. The chapter makes the case for reducing the use of grade repetition and early tracking, identifying at-risk students and intervening early on, providing a continuum of support for struggling students, and holding high expectations for all students.

  • Building an equitable, excellent and inclusive education system

    Excellence and equity in student performance are less related to a country’s income or expenditure on education than to how those educational resources are allocated, and to the policies, practices and learning environments that determine the conditions in which students work. This chapter identifies some of the steps policy makers can take to build school systems that are both equitable and excellent: attract, nurture and retain qualified teachers; allocate resources equitably; make pre-primary education accessible to all; and avoid socio-economic segregation within school systems.

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