Education in Thailand
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Education in Thailand

An OECD-UNESCO Perspective

Thailand’s education system stands at a crossroads. Significant investment has widened access to education and the country performs relatively well in international assessments compared with its peers. But the benefits have not been universally distributed and Thailand has not received the return on its spending on education that it might have expected. This report encourages Thailand to focus on four priority areas to prepare students from all backgrounds for a fast-changing world. The first is to set clear, common standards for all students through a revised and improved curriculum. The second priority is to build capacity to reliably assess students across the full range of competencies needed for success in life and in learning. Third, Thailand needs to develop a holistic strategy to prepare teachers and school leaders to deliver education reform, including implementing the revised curriculum, and to tackle teaching shortages in the most deprived areas. The final challenge is to create a comprehensive information and communications technology strategy to equip all Thailand’s schools, teachers and students for the 21st century.

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The basic education system in Thailand: A comparative policy perspective You do not have access to this content

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Author(s):
OECD

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This chapter outlines the basic education system in Thailand and compares it to two groups of benchmark countries – similar middle-income southeast Asian countries and high-income Asia-Pacific ones – on five key policy areas: inputs, access, processes, outcomes and efficiencies.

 
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