E-learning in Tertiary Education

E-learning in Tertiary Education

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Centre for Educational Research and Innovation

English
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Author(s):
OECD
01 June 2005
Pages:
292
ISBN:
9789264009219 (PDF) ;9789264009202(print)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264009219-en

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Following the burst of the dot-com bubble in 2000, scepticism about e-learning replaced over-enthusiasm. Rhetoric aside, where do we stand? Why and how do different kinds of tertiary education institutions engage in e-learning? What do institutions perceive to be the pedagogic impact of e-learning in its different forms? How do institutions understand the costs of e-learning? How might e-learning impact staffing and staff development? This book addresses these and many other questions.

The study is based on a qualitative survey of practices and strategies carried out by the OECD Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI) at 19 tertiary education institutions from 11 OECD member countries – Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States – and 2 non-member countries – Brazil and Thailand. This qualitative survey is complemented by the findings of a quantitative survey of e-learning in tertiary education carried out in 2004 by the Observatory on Borderless Higher Education (OBHE) in some Commonwealth countries.

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  • Executive Summary
    E-learning is becoming increasingly prominent in tertiary education. All available evidence point to growing enrolments and provision, although from a low starting point. However, after the hype of the new economy, growing disenchantment with e-learning has replaced over-enthusiasm. Failures of e-learning operations have, at least temporarily, overshadowed the prospects of widened and flexible access to tertiary education, pedagogic innovation, decreased cost, etc., that e-learning once embodied. So where do...
  • Introduction
    E-learning is becoming increasingly prominent in tertiary education. Rationales for its growth are wide-ranging, complex and contested, including widening access, on-campus pedagogic innovation, enhancement of distance learning, organisational change, knowledge-sharing and revenue generation.
  • E-learning Provision and Enrolments
    This chapter assesses the magnitude and importance of e-learning in terms of online presence of programmes and online learning (enrolments). It clearly shows the diversity of e-learning provision across tertiary education institutions, in terms of both current activities and targets. In most campus-based institutions, the growth of e-learning to date has not challenged the centrality of the face-to-face classroom setting. Like distance online learning in general, cross-border e-learning has generally failed to emerge as a significant market. The majority of e-learning has taken place on-campus, with the necessarily more...
  • E-learning Strategies and Rationales
    The chapter set out to give a detailed picture of how, "where" and to what extent e-learning in the broadest sense was a feature of institutional strategy; how strategies came about, what they consist of, and whether and how they have been revised.
  • Impacts on Teaching and Learning
    This chapter explores how institutions perceive the pedagogic impact of e-learning and how they are trying to enhance it. The "learning object" model, perhaps the most prominent revolutionary pedagogic approach of e-learning to date, is given a special focus.
  • IT Infrastructure
    This chapter gives an overview of the adoption and usage of different software and techniques. It first focuses on the adoption, use and challenges of learning management systems (LMS), that is, software designed to provide a range of administrative and pedagogic services related to formal education settings (e.g. enrolment data, access to electronic course materials, faculty/student interaction, assessment). It reports the reasons for institutional decisions to use proprietary or open source systems, to prefer in-house developments or commercial outsourcing, and points to the challenges for further development, notably in terms of integration and functionalities. It also explores investment in IT infrastructure and usage of applications other than LMS by institutions in order to support or complement e-learning: IT...
  • Partnership and Networking
    Partnership has burgeoned in tertiary education over the last decades, and is a key characteristic of contemporary e-learning arrangements. The rationales for joining forces include achieving benefits such as advanced technology, quality curricula, enhanced market presence, and lower costs. This chapter documents institutional involvement in e-learning consortia of various kinds, arrangements to make an institution’s e-learning materials available to third parties, for example...
  • Staff Development and Organisational Change
    The chapter first gives an overview of how the case study institutions view the main forms of organisational change and barriers related to e-learning, before focusing on staff development. All sample universities are in the midst of thinking through and negotiating the potential contribution of e-learning in its various forms to organisational futures. The chapter illustrates the diversity of methods for developing institutional human resources. Just as there is no one "best model" or trajectory for e-learning development for institutions, nor is there a...
  • Funding, Costing and Pricing
    This chapter shows where the funding of e-learning has come from at an institutional level and examines some of its associated challenges. It then reports how institutions perceive the cost of e-learning and how it has been priced so far.
  • Current Government Roles
    This chapter shows how institutions view current governmental activities in e-learning, and what they expect from them in terms of funding and other policies.
  • Conclusion
    E-learning is becoming increasingly prominent in tertiary education. All available evidence points toward growing enrolments and provision albeit from a low starting point. However, after the hype of the new economy, growing disenchantment with e-learning has replaced over-enthusiasm. Failures of e-learning operations have, at least temporarily, overshadowed the prospects of widened and flexible access to tertiary education, pedagogic innovation, and decreased cost that was once embodied by e-learning. So where do we stand after the end of the hype of the new economy? What are...
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