Connected Minds
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Connected Minds

Technology and Today's Learners

In all OECD countries, digital media and connectedness are integral to the lives of today’s learners. It is often claimed that these learners are "new millennium learners", or "digital natives", who have different expectations about education. This book contributes to the debate about the effects of technology attachment and connectedness on today’s learners, and their expectations about teaching.

The book sets out to answer the following questions: Can the claim that today’s students are "new millenium learners" or "digital natives be sustained empirically? Is there consistent research evidence demonstrating the effects of technology on cognitive development, social values, and learning expectations? What are the implications for educational policy and practice?

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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/9611031e.pdf
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Publication Date :
23 July 2012
DOI :
10.1787/9789264111011-en
 
Chapter
 

How relevant connectedness is for young people You do not have access to this content

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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/education/connected-minds/how-relevant-connectedness-is-for-young-people_9789264111011-5-en
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Author(s):
OECD
Pages :
51–67
DOI :
10.1787/9789264111011-5-en

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Young people’s attachment to digital media and connectivity will shortly reach a level of almost universal saturation in OECD countries. In the Nordic countries, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and Austria, more than 95% of 15-year-olds use a computer connected to the Internet daily while at home. On average, two hours per day are devoted to a number of ICT activities, mostly related to social interactions and the consumption of digital content, sometimes in connection with schoolrelated tasks. However, despite these impressive developments the use of a general stereotype, such as the New Millennium Learners, may be inappropriate when it comes to understanding the complexity of the implications that digital media and connectivity can have on the lives on young people. Only a higher level of granularity can unveil important differences among learners that often translate into alternative profiles, needs and expectations in relation to both technology and learning.