OECD Economics Department Working Papers

ISSN :
1815-1973 (online)
DOI :
10.1787/18151973
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Working papers from the Economics Department of the OECD that cover the full range of the Department’s work including the economic situation, policy analysis and projections; fiscal policy, public expenditure and taxation; and structural issues including ageing, growth and productivity, migration, environment, human capital, housing, trade and investment, labour markets, regulatory reform, competition, health, and other issues.

The views expressed in these papers are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of the OECD or of the governments of its member countries.

 

Workplace Stress in the United States

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Author(s):
Michael Darden1
Author Affiliations
  • 1: Tulane University, United States

Publication Date
21 July 2014
Bibliographic information
No.:
1150
Pages
20
DOI
10.1787/5jz0zb5t4532-en

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Despite relative affluence, workplace stress is a prominent feature of the US labour market. To the extent that job stress causes poor health outcomes – either directly through increased blood pressure, fatigue, muscle pain, etc. or indirectly through increased rates of cigarette smoking – policy to lessen job stress may be appropriate. Focusing predominantly on the United States, this report reviews the literature on a variety of economic concerns related to job stress and health. Areas in which economists may provide valuable insights regarding job stress include empirical selection concerns in identifying the effect of stress on health; measurement error with respect to stress; the existence and magnitude of compensating differentials for stress; and the unique "job lock" effect in the United States created by a system of employer-provided health insurance. This report concludes with a brief discussion of US policies related to job stress. This Working Paper relates to the 2014 OECD Economic Survey of the United States (www.oecd.org/eco/surveys/United States ).
Keywords:
labour market policies, job stress, health
JEL Classification:
  • I1: Health, Education, and Welfare / Health
  • J22: Labor and Demographic Economics / Demand and Supply of Labor / Time Allocation and Labor Supply