Strategic Transport Infrastructure Needs to 2030
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Strategic Transport Infrastructure Needs to 2030

Transcontinental Infrastructure Needs to 2030/50 explores the long-term opportunities and challenges facing major gateway and transport hub infrastructures --  ports, airports and major rail corridors – in the coming decades.  The report uses projections and scenarios to assess the broader economic outlook and future infrastructure requirements, and examines the options for financing these, not least against the backdrop of the economic recession and financial crisis which have significantly modified the risks and potential rewards associated with major infrastructure projects.  Building on numerous in-depth case studies from Europe, North America and Asia, the report offers insights into the economic prospects for these key facilities and identifies policy options for improved gateway and corridor infrastructure in the future.
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/9211071e.pdf
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Publication Date :
27 Feb 2012
DOI :
10.1787/9789264114425-en
 
Chapter
 

The global and regional outlook for the economy, trade and transport You do not have access to this content

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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/9211071ec003.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economics/strategic-transport-infrastructure-needs-to-2030/the-global-and-regional-outlook-for-the-economy-trade-and-transport_9789264168626-3-en
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Author(s):
OECD
Pages :
27–50
DOI :
10.1787/9789264168626-3-en

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Reference projections suggest "global GDP will continue to grow strongly and could double over the period to 2030" – and GDP, GDP per capita and international trade are major drivers of increased passenger and trade flows and related international transport needs. In the future, the largest increases in these flows are expected intra-Asia and along the major trade routes between Asia and the largest developed regions, i.e. Asia- North America and Asia-Europe. In terms of trade, world port container volumes could be three to four times higher by 2030 and five to six times current levels by 2050. Rail passenger and freight demand could increase at around 2-3% per annum, close to world GDP. Robust but differentiated global economic growth across developed and developing countries – and the resulting trade and transport growth – will place increasing pressure on infrastructure, which will need to handle the large increases in traffic.