OECD Papers

Discontinued
Frequency :
Monthly
ISSN :
1681-2328 (online)
ISSN :
1609-1914 (print)
DOI :
10.1787/16812328
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OECD Papers provides access to a collection of substantive papers not published as books or articles in other OECD series or journals. All subjects are covered, from the latest OECD research on macroeconomics and economic policies, to work in areas as varied as employment, education, environment, trade, science and technology, development and taxation. OECD Papers are available on a subscription basis. Now a part of the OECD Journal

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Mark Number Date Article Volume and Issue Click to Access
  05 Sep 2008 Partnership for Development: Agriculture in Africa
OECD

The NEPAD founding statement of 2001 identified agriculture as a sectoral priority. Key declarations include the 2003 CAADP Framework calling for 6% agricultural growth rates; the 2003 Maputo Declaration calling for 10% of public expenditure to be spent on agriculture and rural development within 5 years; the 2004 Sirte Declaration on ’The Challenges of Implementing Integrated and Sustainable Development on Agriculture and Water in Africa’; and the 2006 Abuja Declarations on Fertilisers (June) and Food Security (December)...

Volume 7 Issue 12 Click to Access: 
  05 Sep 2008 Partnership for Development: Infrastructure in Africa
OECD

The NEPAD founding statement of 2001 identified infrastructure as a key sectoral priority. It proposed a programme including increased investment both in maintenance and in new infrastructure, new regulatory frameworks, and the promotion of public-private partnerships. NEPAD subsequently developed a Short-Term Action Plan designed to accelerate progress in this sector, and a Medium-Long Term Strategic Framework. Successive meetings of AU Ministers have underlined the importance of infrastructure to economic growth.

Volume 7 Issue 12 Click to Access: 
  05 Sep 2008 Partnership for Development: Africa and International Trade
OECD

The NEPAD founding statement of 2001 emphasised the importance of trade and within this a number of specific themes including diversification of production, enhanced international competitiveness, promotion of exports, and improvements in market access. The paper prepared by the NEPAD Secretariat for the 7th meeting of the APF in Moscow in October 2006 identified 4 main areas in which African efforts were focused: deepening of African integration; trade facilitation efforts; private sector participation in building trade-enabling infrastructure; and mainstreaming of trade and national development strategies...

Volume 7 Issue 12 Click to Access: 
  05 Sep 2008 Partnership for Development: Investment in Africa
OECD

The NEPAD founding statement of 2001 clearly identified the need to increase private capital flows to Africa, as an essential component of a sustainable long-term approach to filling the resource gap. It identified priorities including addressing risk perception, building public-private partnerships, and deepening capital markets. Successive statements by African governments have reinforced these priorities.

The African Peer Review Mechanism includes ‘increased trade and investment among the participating countries’ and ‘increased co-operation in mobilising and attracting both domestic and foreign investment’ among its ‘high priority areas’...

Volume 7 Issue 12 Click to Access: 
  05 Sep 2008 Partnership for Development: Finance for Development in Africa
OECD

NEPAD’s founding statement in 2001 identified domestic savings and improvements in public revenue collection as key resources to be supplemented by official development assistance, debt relief and private capital flows. The statement further underlined that improved governance is a prerequisite for increased capital flows...

Volume 7 Issue 12 Click to Access: 
  05 Sep 2008 Review of Donors' Policies and Practices Related to Employment and Labour Markets
OECD

The purpose of this review is to collect evidence on the instruments and modalities donors use to promote
employment creation and to draw some preliminary lessons on what worked and what might need to be changed. These results will feed into the preparation of the Task Team’s two other outputs: i) a conceptual framework that gives greater centrality to employment issues in efforts to reduce poverty; and ii) a set of good practice papers that provide evidence-based examples of how donors can help improve employment outcomes in developing countries.

Volume 7 Issue 12 Click to Access: 
  05 Sep 2008 Proposal to Use Health as a "Tracer Sector" for Tracking Progress on the Paris Declaration
OECD
The health sector has always been an important recipient of global attention and external assistance. Humanitarian concerns about the health of the world’s poor, along with fears about the spread of epidemics such as HIV/AIDS, have made health a central pillar of most development policies. Over the last 30 years attention has increased with the emergence of new health threats - such as HIV/AIDS and pandemic influenza - and with recognition that health is a key determinant of economic growth, labor force productivity and poverty reduction. At the same time, health is increasingly viewed as a human right, the fulfillment of which places obligations on both developed and developing countries. Health has also been at the forefront of the debate on what aid effectiveness means from a sectoral perspective. In the mid-1990s health policymakers designed and pioneered sector-wide approaches (SWAps), which aimed to foster ownership, improve donor harmonization and aid predictability, and align policy behind a health-reform program agreed between government and donors. As this paper illustrates, aid effectiveness is particularly challenging in health. As with other sectors, difficulties are the result of inefficiencies in the global aid architecture and of poor country policies; however, problems in health are exacerbated by the inherent complexities of the sector itself. The large number and diverse nature of development partners active in health, the large unmet needs, the dependency on multiple sectors to achieve health outcomes, the major roles of the private sector in both financing and delivery, and the long-term recurrent nature of most health needs have created challenges for countries, but have also stimulated innovative ideas on how to move forward. As a result, the health sector may be a good "tracer" sector for OECD/ DAC to monitor overall harmonization and alignment progress.
Volume 7 Issue 12 Click to Access: 
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